Newsletter: June 2021

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

Picture a swiftly-moving river, tumbling over rocks, swirling with currents and eddies. Trying to swim in such a river would be a tiring, and probably frightening, experience. You would feel buffeted and pushed around by forces stronger than you. The world would seem to be rushing by. You wouldn’t know what to expect next.

Now picture yourself sitting on the bank, quietly breathing, observing the river. You now have perspective. You see the river in context: it has boundaries, it’s not all there is, and although in some places the water is swift and choppy, in others it is smooth and calm. Meanwhile the ground you are sitting on is solid. The river is moving, but you don’t have to go along for the ride.

The river can represent several different things: our thoughts, the stress of our daily activities, the endless stream of news and images on television and the Internet. It gets exhausting if we don’t take a break from it all. Thomas Merton wrote, “The rush and pressure of modern life are a form, perhaps the most common form, of its innate violence.” He was a Trappist monk, and he wrote these words more than 50 years ago. Prayerful solitude gave Merton clarity: he saw how the frenzy of modern life destroys our capacity for inner peace and hence the fruitfulness of our lives.

We increasingly live in a manufactured world, one designed to “push our buttons” and keep us distracted. To preserve the sanctity of the human soul, an excellent and time-honored safeguard is found in contemplative silence. You’ve probably felt the need yourself for some periodic down-time. For us Little Sisters, one of the benefits of our life is that we have scheduled time every day for prayer and quiet. These times are more than simply taking a break: we let go of our restless minds and present ourselves to the Lord, being receptive to His presence.

Our model is Jesus, who, as Scripture relates, “in the morning, a great while before dawn, rose and went out to a deserted place, and there he prayed” (Mark 1:35). You may recall that the mission of the Joseph House, which you share in through your support, is “Cry the Gospel with your life!” This is part of that, being men and women of prayer. The hidden spring of our service to the poor is our silence before God.

Centered and grounded, we can respond to someone’s crisis with peace. We can mirror to that person the reality of hope. It’s also easier to give that person our full attention, a fundamental sign of respect and affirmation of human dignity.

Fred, 60, first came to see us last summer and we wrote about him in our September Newsletter. He is disabled after being hit by a car while riding his bike. Fred was able to find a part-time job he could do and worked for a few months. His pay was not much, $196/month, but it helped a lot. Now Social Security is deducting that much from his check for the length of time that he worked since he was not allowed to do it. Fred could not pay his electric bill, so we paid $300 toward the past-due amount to keep the power on in his home.

Ross, 55, is a pleasant man. You would never guess at all the health problems he has. He is currently waiting for a heart transplant. Ross depends on doing odd jobs to pay his bills, but his health is slowing him down. He used his stimulus check to pay a very large overdue water bill and a few other necessary expenses. He did not have enough for the electric bill, so we contributed $300.

Venita, 63, supports herself by being a home health aide. Many of her clients, however, are afraid to use her services because of the pandemic. Venita is barely getting by month to month. She is afraid of losing her home where she has lived for 11 years. Her most pressing need at the moment was the electric so we made a payment of $300.

Joellen, 59, is a cancer patient and receiving chemotherapy. After losing her job she had to purchase private health insurance. The monthly premium takes half of her temporary cash benefits. Joellen fell behind in paying her rent. We mailed $300 to her landlord to stop the eviction proceedings.

Eunice, 66, is also sinking under the weight of health care expenses. Poor health is a ticket to poverty—that’s what our nation seems to accept. Eunice needs to have surgery on her back. Her out-of-pocket medical expenses eat away at her very limited fixed income. She could not pay the full amount of her last two rent payments and was worried she was going to get evicted. We contributed $300 to help her catch up.

Artie, 60, lives alone and needs his car to get to work. Unexpected vehicle expenses set him back with his other bills. Artie needed help with his electric bill, but was denied assistance at another agency because his income was slightly above the poverty threshold (which is only $12,760 annually for a single person—it’s not in touch with reality). Fortunately, there is no red tape at the Joseph House and we could help Artie with $300.

Thank you for your continued support! The Joseph House depends on you.

News about our Annual Golf Tournament Fund-Raiser: Regretfully, as a precaution against COVID-19, our loyal Golf Committee has decided to again postpone our 15th Annual Joseph House Golf Tournament. Since its inception in 2006 the event has been a source of much-needed revenue, thanks to the generosity of our sponsors and participating golfers, and the untiring effort of our committee and tournament volunteers. To all, we express our sincere thanks. Our hope is that, God willing, 2022 will see the return of our Golf Tournament at beautiful Green Hill Country Club!

In this “Year of St. Joseph,” patron of fathers, we wish all men blessed with the vocation to be a father a most Happy Father’s Day. And may the abundant graces of God be with you and your loved ones, keeping you healthy and safe and in good spirits. Part of our prayer time every day is spent praying for your intentions.

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary

Please send us your prayer requests: Contact Form.
To help us serve those in need, go here: Donate.


Our convent has a chapel, Thomas Merton had a hermitage, but every home can have a sacred space for prayer. Here are a few ideas from Fr. Edward Hays:

The typical home in the Western world has rooms for all the important activities in life. There are rooms for eating, sleeping, bathing, storage, relaxing and even a room for keeping your vehicle. While your entire home is a sacred place where you pray and journey to God in different ways, it can be invaluable to set aside a particular place for your inner exercises. . . . For a fortunate few this personal shrine could be an entire room such as an unused bedroom or a small den. But for the majority it will mean a corner of a room.

You might, for example, choose a corner of your bedroom and set it aside as your prayer place. A stone slab could serve as a small altar, or you could create one out of wood. You may also find it valuable to have a small prayer rug to sit upon only in meditation or prayer.

If you are a highly visual person, you may desire to use a variety of symbols, icons, or images to grace your personal shrine. If you are not especially visually oriented, you might want to create a space which is void of all images. The very simplicity of an empty wall can help clear your mind and heart of clutter and help open you into prayer.

Icon of Our Lady of Vladimir in our Salisbury chapel. Our founder loved this image of Mary, also known as Our Lady of Tenderness, and wanted it placed in all of our chapels.

You may also find it beneficial to vary the design of your personal shrine or change the images in it with each of the four seasons. Because our technological culture often separates us from a direct contact with the changes that occur in nature with each season, altering the environment of your shrine can help make your prayer more natural and in harmony with God’s creation.

And since we easily become blind to what is “always” there, the introduction of visual changes for various feasts, holidays and special occasions has the power to cleanse the eye and so open the heart. To make use of flowers or other images on holy days and special occasions will also assist in making your personal shrine a “living” place of prayer. An unchangeable prayer space can easily become a static one.

Understanding that personal tastes and needs will direct your choices in these suggestions, experiment with finding the kind of environment that can best open you to God in prayer.

from Prayers For A Planetary Pilgrim

Thomas Merton (1915-1968) outside his hermitage at the Abbey of Our Lady of Gethsemani in Kentucky.

“The soul is made not for noise but for recollection, and life should be a preparation for heaven not only in meritorious works but also in peace and recollection in God. Man, however, is immersed in endless discussion; the lack of true joy he finds in noise should more than convince him that he has wandered far from his vocation.” – Charles de Foucauld

Newsletter: May 2021

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

To be homeless means more than just being without shelter. It means to go without everything implied by the word “home.”

Imagine not having a bed to sleep in or a bathroom to use. Imagine not having a kitchen, with no refrigerator or freezer to store your food and no stove or oven to cook anything. Imagine no lights or heat or tap water whenever you need it. Imagine being exposed with no privacy, and yet at the same time feeling invisible because you’re ignored. A home provides many essential material things, that is true. But think of what it means to feel “at home,” to feel safe and secure and at peace. There we see the full value of having a place to call home—and the tragedy to be without one.

In responding to the issue of homelessness, there are two schools of thought: the “housing ready” approach says we need to take care of someone’s problems before he or she is ready for housing, while the “housing first” approach says we need to give someone a place to live before anything else can be done. Studies indicate that the latter is more effective. A person who is homeless has a better chance of dealing with other issues when he or she has a fixed address.

Our founder, Sr. Mary Elizabeth, had this in mind when she opened the Joseph House Village, a transitional housing facility for women and children, back in 1991. Her rationale:

“We need to give them time when they’re secure and can put their minds on developing themselves and not worrying about what they’re going to eat or where they’re going to sleep.”

It was this “nagging realization” that led to the Village (which later became independent and renamed the Village of Hope), and then the Joseph House Workshop, our residential program for homeless men.

Some people who experience homelessness need the services provided by facilities like the Village and Workshop. Some, but not all: the leading cause of homelessness is the lack of affordable housing. This is a problem across the country. At the Joseph House Crisis Center, we see many people who pay anywhere from 50 to 90% of their income and wages on rent. Paying this much isn’t sustainable, of course. It initiates a chain reaction of difficulties, including the very real possibility of getting evicted.

For someone with a low income, a housing voucher from the federal government’s subsidized housing program offers hope. With a voucher, a tenant pays 30% of his or her income toward the rent and the government pays the remainder. This type of rental assistance can make a world of difference. A study from New York City, for example, found that only 1% of families who left a homeless shelter for subsidized housing were homeless again within a year (the rates of recurrence are typically much higher). Unfortunately, funding for this program is no match for the need. Waiting lists are measured in years.

Having a place to call home is the foundation for getting on with life. There are many circumstances that lead to homelessness, and even when someone does have a place to live it’s not always healthy, happy, and safe. Through our work at Joseph House, we meet people wherever they are on their journey and do what we can to help. Through your prayers and support, you are part of this effort too.

Byron, 36, became homeless after he lost his job. He lived in his car with his 15-year-old son. Sometimes they got a respite in the house of a friend or acquaintance. Byron found a new job and then an apartment that seemed affordable. Moving in, however, was going to cost $1,125! That was the total for the deposit and the first month’s rent. It’s hard to save up that amount on low wages. We contributed $325 so Byron and his son would not be homeless anymore.

Darius lived in an old house that had been subdivided into two apartments. The house caught on fire and was badly damaged. Darius lost most of his belongings. He has fused bones in his ankle, the result of an injury sustained from falling off a ladder. Finding work is difficult for him. Darius had $400 to spare to move into a new place, but it was not enough. We paid the remaining $350 to the landlord.

Zachary is 80. His housemate suffered a stroke and had to go to a nursing home. Zachary is now solely responsible for the rent, which takes 97% of his Social Security. He’s not sure what to do. With nothing to pay toward his overdue gas bill, we contributed $350 to prevent a disconnect.

Vivian, 40, cannot walk because of an undiagnosed medical condition that is causing a buildup of fluid around her spinal cord. She has no income at the moment and no family in the area. Although Vivian’s landlord is sympathetic to her situation, he said he’d have to evict her if he didn’t receive any payment for the rent. Vivian reached out to many organizations for help to no avail. Then she contacted us. We sent $300 to her landlord.

Antoinette is only 20 and trying to get settled on her own. Her father is in prison and her mother is a drug addict. Antoinette found a job cleaning houses. Her grandmother, who has subsidized housing, gave her a place to stay. This was in violation of the lease, and if it was discovered they would both get evicted. Antoinette was desperate to move, but the deposits were steep everywhere she looked. We contributed $300 so Antoinette could move and her grandmother’s housing would not be in jeopardy.

Marlon, 64, is living on a fixed income in a trailer park. The lot rent takes 50% of his monthly check. There was a bad water leak underneath his mobile home, which can easily happen when the pipes are not properly insulated. Paying off the repair bills plus the huge water bill left Marlon with nothing for his other expenses. We paid $300 toward his electric bill to prevent a cut-off.

No matter what the need is, we are here to help. Thank you for your continued support of Joseph House. We appreciate you very much!

Springtime and Mother’s Day always inspire us to celebrate the gift of life. This is a time of renewal, and even though the covid cloud is still over us, we feel in our hearts a sense of hope. We pray for the world and we pray for you, that God in His great love for you will bless you and keep you safe. And may special blessings rest gently upon all mothers, God’s co-creators who fashioned the first home for each one of us.

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary

The Joseph House depends on you. You can make a donation here: Donate.
Please send us you prayer requests so we can pray for you: Contact Form.


To Be Homeless

To be homeless means that you have no place to hang up your coat, or your skirt, or your tie.
There are no pegs to put them on. The size of a closet doesn’t matter anymore. Only paper bags.

To be homeless means that you can never “put out the dog”—or the cat, or go to the door and call them inside and have their dish of food ready by the frig, and pet them as they lie by your rocking chair and curl up by the fire.

To be homeless means that you can never put up the window to let fresh air inside, nor close it to keep out the cold. You just look through other people’s windows.

To be homeless (if you have children) means that you cannot take them out and then say to them, “Come on, honey. It’s time to go home.” Nor tuck them in their own beds and read them a bedtime story, and turn out the light and say prayers with them. You just survive.

To be homeless means that you have no medicine cabinet to search for an aspirin, no telephone
to use to dial your doctor, no health care plan to refer to if you end up in the hospital, no sense of dignity to sustain you when you faint and fall soundlessly on the sidewalk.

To be homeless means that you will not be among those who decide whether they will eat in the kitchen or the dining room or maybe on the patio, nor whether they will barbeque hamburgers or steak, or have cold Pepsi and potato salad and pickles, or who will do the dishes afterward and put them in the cupboard.

To be homeless means that you join the millions of refugees across our world who roam from place to place without shelter, who agonize because they must beg or depend on people who have to give to them, and often those who have are afraid that if they give, they will have to look you in the face, and that will hurt more than they can bear.

by Peggy Heiner

Miracles Happen

Charles de Foucauld (“Br. Charles”) is the spiritual father of the Little Sisters and the Joseph House. Although he is not well known to many people, Br. Charles had a deep influence on our founder, Sr. Mary Elizabeth Gintling. She considered him a saint, and now he is close to being one in fact.

On May 3, 2021, at a meeting at the Vatican called an Ordinary Public Consistory, the cardinals voted to proceed with the canonization of Br. Charles along with six other beatified men and women. The vote was confirmed by Pope Francis, who has mentioned Br. Charles several times in his encyclicals and public addresses.

This Consistory vote was the last formal step in the process of approving Br. Charles’ canonization. Ordinarily, a date for the actual canonization would have been set at this time, but the Pope is postponing that because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The process of canonization is typically long, and the one for Br. Charles is no exception (he died more than a century ago in 1916). Written documents need to compiled and the person’s life has to be examined in detail. The holiness of his or her life has to be determined (and it is important to note that this doesn’t mean being perfect and without flaws–saints are products of their time in history like everyone else). When someone is canonized, he or she is declared to be a model for living the Christian life. A saint’s life has “universal” teaching value: people from all walks of life can learn something and be inspired.

The final pieces of evidence need to be bona fide miracles, proof that the proposed saint is in heaven interceding for us on earth. This is also what it means to be a canonized saint: someone the faithful can turn to for prayers.

Br. Charles was beatified in 2005 (allowing him to be called “Blessed”) after an Italian woman was cured of bone cancer that was attributed to his intercession. In order to be canonized and be considered a saint, a second miracle was needed. This is the story of that miracle.

On November 30, 2016, the day before the 100th anniversary of the death of Br. Charles, a 21-year-old man (whose name is Charle, without the “s”), was working as a carpenter’s apprentice on the renovation of the Chapel of the Lycée Saint Louis, a church in Saumur, France. This chapel happens to be very close to the military school that Br. Charles attended in his youth.

Charle was working above the vault when he fell about 50 feet, landing on a wooden bench. It shattered, and he was impaled by a piece of wood that pierced his left side just below his heart and came out the back underneath his rib cage.

Amazingly, Charle stood up and began to walk. Help was called and a helicopter arrived to take Charle to the hospital, but the piece of wood passing through his body prevented him from safely entering the craft. So he had to wait for an ambulance.

Chapel of the Lycée Saint Louis, 32 Rue d’Alsace, Saumur, Pays de la Loire, France. From Google Maps.

Meanwhile, the manager of the company that Charle worked for was alerted. He contacted people at his parish to get them to start praying. His parish was newly established in 2012 and is named after Blessed Charles de Foucauld! In preparation for his feast day on December 1, parishioners had already been praying a novena for his canonization. With news of the accident, hundreds of people began to pray in earnest, asking Blessed Charles to intercede for the young man. The following morning, his mother called the manager: her son was alive, the operation to remove the piece of wood was successful, and no organs were damaged! The accident should have been fatal, but nothing is impossible for God.

Charle spent only a week in the hospital. He suffered no long-term effects and returned to work several weeks later. Despite not being a practicing Christian himself, he is very happy that his recovery was recognized to be due to Br. Charles’ intercession. The pastor of the church in Saumur remarked, “When you know the life of Charles de Foucauld, it’s astonishing to see that the miracle attributed to him concerns someone who has no Christian faith…This echoes his missionary desire to go and to evangelize those who are not in the Church.”

Pope Francis approved the authenticity of this miracle on May 27, 2020. Now a year later, the saint-making process is complete. When it is safe to celebrate publicly, our newest saint will make his entrance: St. Charles de Foucauld!

Stories like this miracle are not unique. It is comforting to know that we are not alone, that the love and prayers of the people who have gone before us, whether they are official saints or not, accompany us through life.

Banner from the Beatification in 2005.

Note: This post was originally included with our November 2020 Newsletter. It has been reposted with additional information. Learn more about Charles de Foucauld.

In Remembrance: Anne Cuomo

Anne Cuomo, one of our many wonderful volunteers, passed away on February 3, 2021, from COVID-19. She was a special friend of our community.

After earning her B.A. in Mathematics, Anne worked for 34 years in the field of computer and software management for the Department of Defense. Her husband Peter died in 1986, and when Anne retired in 1997 she moved back to her hometown of Salisbury.

She came by one day and asked Sr. Mary Elizabeth, “How can I help?” Sister loved hearing those words. Our Representative Payee Program was in need of a Director, so Anne jumped in and got completely involved. The program is for people who have difficulty in managing their household budgets. Under our supervision, a volunteer handles the checkbook for clients in the program, helping them to avoid financial hardships.

Anne and Sr. Mary Elizabeth.

Anne was perfect for the job. She was thorough and meticulous and her personal warmth put people at ease. Anne would meet with potential clients, and if the program was a good fit for them, she would make the necessary arrangements at the bank. She liked to visit clients in their homes and take them shopping so as to better understand their spending habits. That enabled her to match each client with the right volunteer. Anne oversaw a few clients herself, even helping them move when they needed safer and more affordable housing. She was a dedicated advocate with a deep concern for the welfare of other people.

Anne quickly proved herself invaluable to us, and Sr. Mary Elizabeth invited her to join the Advisory Committee for the Joseph House Workshop. Anne brought her enthusiasm and efficiency to the huge task that lay ahead. The Workshop was initially just a dream, but over the course of several years Anne was instrumental in making it a reality. Her project management skills were a tremendous blessing. In addition, she brought a willing spirit, a kind heart, and a joyful sense of humor, and this made everything easier for all of us.

Anne became Co-Director of the Workshop (along with Dave MacLeod) during the time of the second pilot program. She recruited teachers and volunteers, and to prepare for the final version of the program she helped Sr. Mary Elizabeth establish the Advisory Board, on which she later served. Anne also found a seat on the Board for the Little Sisters—her wisdom was always in demand!

Anne and Dave MacLeod in front of the Joseph House Workshop (before the renovations).
Anne at the graduation ceremony for the second pilot program with other members of the Workshop team.

Anne made countless donations to the Joseph House in many ways, never holding back in giving her time, talent, and resources. She was loving and friendly to all, enjoyed music, and sang in the church choir. Ever so humble, Anne loved a good laugh and spread her cheerfulness wherever she went. She also had a precious cat, Sophie, and they were totally suited for each other.

Anne was so dear and loved by everyone, especially Sr. Mary Elizabeth and the Little Sisters, plus all who knew her at the Joseph House. In her later years at an assisted living facility, Anne was appointed the Goodwill Ambassador to greet the new residents. Her smile and friendly nature made everyone feel welcome. We’re not alone in missing her, but our loss is Heaven’s gain. May she rest forever in the embrace of God’s love.

Anne with a few other very special people at a birthday party for Sr. Mary Elizabeth. So many memories…

We wish we could offer a fitting tribute to all of our volunteers. Each one makes a difference, each one enacts the mission of the Joseph House to “Cry the Gospel with your life!” We lift them all up to the Lord with praise and thanksgiving.

Newsletter: April 2021

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

The extreme cold experienced in Texas and other parts of the south left millions of people shivering in the dark after the power grid failed. No lights, no heat, no water for days on end. Some people died. The deep freeze was a stark reminder of how easily life can be disrupted, how vulnerable we are, how quickly anyone can be in need of basic necessities.

As if anyone needed another reminder after a year of pandemic-living.

It can be sobering to realize that our infrastructure is not as rock-solid as we’d like to think it is. We’re used to not even thinking about it all, always assuming it will be there to take care of us. When brought face-to-face with its limitations and outright failure, some people feel helpless while others adopt a survivalist, go-it-alone mentality. But a closer look at recent events shows us where our strength and our hope can be found, and that is in the countless displays of neighbor helping neighbor, of people stepping up and reaching out, of doing what they can to help other people in need. Some may choose barricades and stockpiles, but solidarity is the real key to survival.

Our brothers and sisters in faith, that first generation of post-Resurrection believers (who knew a thing or two about living in hard times), offer us more inspiration:

The community of believers was of one heart and mind, and no one claimed that any of his possessions was his own, but they had everything in common…There was no needy person among them, for those who owned property or houses would sell them, bring the proceeds of the sale, and put them at the feet of the apostles, and they were distributed to each according to need. (Acts 4:32,34-35)

Their faith was more than just words—it changed how they lived.

During these days of Easter and early spring, when life is full of promise, let us not forget that the poor always face the dangers of want and deprivation. Even when the weather is good there are mothers with hungry children, disabled people living in darkened homes, and families out in the cold. No one should have to face his or her trials alone. Your support of the Joseph House helps to strengthen the bonds of community, and through these bonds we find solutions to our problems.

Heather, 39, is starting life over after four years of an abusive marriage. She left with her young daughter, and with no money and nowhere to go, Heather’s car became their home. We paid $350 to a landlord so this mother and child could move into an apartment. Heather is looking for work. Having a place to sleep and to get ready for the day will help.

Roberto is healing from the amputation of three of his toes. He receives only $264 per month in temporary state assistance. He was homeless, and his social worker was trying to find him an affordable place to live. She called us to see if we could place him in a motel for a few days. We paid $204 for five nights.

Abigail, 62, was also homeless and sleeping behind a laundromat. She had been staying with a family member, but then something happened and Abigail had to leave. She didn’t want to talk about it. We paid for a motel, and after Abigail got settled and took a hot shower (which made her very happy), we dropped off groceries and a take-out meal from a restaurant.

Her initial three-night stay at the motel eventually became almost two weeks, but Abigail was busy the whole time trying to find an affordable rental or a shelter opening. She was also waiting for her SSI check. More groceries were delivered and then Abigail finally found a bed in a shelter. The motel bill we paid was $380.

Steven, 71, worked as a forklift operator for 25 years, but then he got laid off. He cannot find another job at his age. The opportunity came to move into an apartment where the rent is income-based. This would help Steven from becoming homeless. He could not move in, however, until he got the utilities turned on, and for that he needed to pay an old gas bill. We contributed $300.

Tricia, 29, was working at a chicken plant until she became sick with COVID-19. She subsequently developed a severe case of vertigo. Tricia has been falling behind in her rent, and although she cannot be evicted because it’s pandemic-related, she will need to make up the missed payments. We contributed $350 toward the back rent.

Dominique, 27, and her daughter had no heat in their home, a trailer that has seen better days. With a job at a convenience store, Dominique is a frontline worker during the pandemic, but yet she could not afford to buy kerosene for her trailer’s furnace. We paid $313 to get the tank filled.

Solidarity puts compassion into action—the true test of our beliefs.

Our founder said only caring communities can really help people in the long run. And communities, of course, are made up of individuals, each one priceless and unique and with a gift to share. Thank you for being a member of our community of donors and prayerful supporters. We treasure each and every one of you, and wish you have a happy and blessed Easter season.

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary

To help us with our work, click here: Donate.
To send us your prayer requests, click here: Contact Form.

Newsletter: March 2021

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

A year ago the pandemic really began to tighten its grip on all of us. Quarantines, lockdowns, and face masks became part of life. There was a long road ahead, but thanks be to God we have made it to this point. Every day has been a surrender to the mercy of God, which is without end. A few of us Little Sisters have been able to get vaccinated. We hope and pray that you are able to do what you need to do to stay healthy. Only together can we bring the spread of this virus under control.

This is true across the board: only together can we do anything about any of the problems facing our world. Our troubled times call into focus the words of Christ in the Gospel of John: “I give you a new commandment: love one another.” As Dorothy Day remarked, this is a commandment, not a counsel.

From your own life experience, you know that love is not always a feeling of liking someone. Love is more about our behavior and how we treat others. For inspiration, we can turn to the thirteenth chapter of First Corinthians. It’s a shot in the arm we all need—and no appointments are required. “Love is patient, love is kind…it is not rude.” A meditative reading of the whole chapter is recommended (it’s not very long). There is no greater way to make a positive contribution to the world than deciding to be a loving person.

Dorothy has more wisdom for us. She wrote about the necessity of “getting on with the business of living,” despite the catastrophes that befall us. The wounded need to be cared for and the hungry need to be fed. “It is walking in the steps of Jesus when He fed the multitude on the hills, and when He prepared the fire and the fish on the shore. He told us to do it. He did it Himself.”

We carry on this sacred work at the Joseph House. It is ground-level work. These difficult times have thrown a harsh light on the inequalities in society. It’s evident that not everyone has access to the same resources and support systems. Your contribution to our mission helps to feed and shelter families in need. Our mission is simply about loving our neighbor—a love based on our common humanity as individuals created in the image of God.

Lance, age 60, was in a very bad situation. He lives alone in a one-room apartment, sharing a kitchen and bathroom with other tenants (the kitchen, always a mess, has a broken stove). With no furniture in his room, Lance was sleeping on the floor at night. A few weeks ago, he fell off a ladder and injured his back. He is still in a lot of pain, but unfortunately his medication was stolen while he was washing up in the bathroom.

Lance came to the Joseph House Crisis Center the day before he was scheduled to be evicted. Our Director became very concerned about Lance’s welfare and made a home visit. Sleeping on a cold, hard floor is no good for anyone, especially someone with a back injury. An air mattress was purchased immediately to give Lance a comfortable place to rest. Our Director also bought two living room chairs at the Habitat ReStore and arranged to have them delivered.

We then paid the rent due ($255) and supplied Lance with bags of groceries. He had eaten nothing in the past three days except a bag of potato chips. Lance needs to find a better place to live, and we are assisting him with that, too. Although he is unable to work, he will receive an SSI check. Lance has an autistic son who likes to visit him. They value their time together, and hopefully in the future Lance will welcome his son in a home that is decent and safe.

Shellie, 56, was also stuck in a deplorable living situation, but then her name reached the top of the list for subsidized housing. It meant the chance to move into a relatively new apartment. Shellie was excited, but a deposit was required, and her job in food service did not pay enough to cover the cost. Since the wait for subsidized housing is measured in years, we contributed $300 so Shellie would not miss this opportunity. She will finally be able to live in a place that isn’t freezing during the winter.

Vernon, 66, was working until he caught COVID-19. He spent two months in the hospital. The recovery has been long, but he’s gradually getting stronger. Right now he is worried about his bills because he hasn’t been able to find a new job. We paid $350 toward his water bill so his service would not be disconnected.

Maria, 27, was working full-time as a nursing assistant until she was diagnosed with cancer. The chemotherapy is taking its toll on her energy level. She can only work about half of her usual hours. Maria lives with her son and needed help paying her rent. We sent $400 to her landlord. Despite all of her trials, Maria is maintaining a positive attitude. She told us she will keep moving forward.

Aretha, 25, was working two jobs to support herself and her young son (the father is incarcerated). After she lost one of her jobs because of the pandemic, she could no longer afford child care for her son, and that meant she wouldn’t be able to work at her second job. Aretha is looking for other child care options, but in the meantime she fell behind in her rent. We paid $300 to stop the eviction.

Trudie, 38, has two children and works for minimum wage at a fast-food restaurant. Her hours have been up and down during the pandemic. We helped with $200 toward her past-due gas bill.

Thank you for enabling us to help these people and many others. Never forget that even the smallest acts of love create a ripple effect, spreading their impact outward. . .

You can find out how to support our work here: Donate

Amanda Gorman was captivating as she recited her poem, “The Hill We Climb,” at the Inauguration in January. There is one line we’d like to share: “Somehow we weathered and witnessed a nation that isn’t broken, but simply unfinished.” That is such a helpful perspective to have—not only for our country, but for other people and ourselves. Unfinished, not broken. There are possibilities for everyone.

The cold days of winter are coming to an end, and that fills us with HOPE. With grateful hearts, we remember you faithfully in our prayers.

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary


March 19 is the Feast of St. Joseph.

Pope Francis has declared 2021 to be the “Year of St. Joseph.” Please read this blog post to learn more about it and for selections from Patris Corde, a personal meditation on St. Joseph by the Pope: The Year of St. Joseph.


Please use our Contact Form to send us your prayer requests. We are happy to lift up your needs to the Lord.

A Pandemic Necessity at the Crisis Center

The Joseph House Crisis Center has remained open during the COVID-19 pandemic, providing food and financial assistance to people in need. As a safety precaution, each person has to wait outside until his or her name is called. We do this so everyone can maintain social distancing inside the building.

Those who have cars wait inside their vehicles. A number of people, however, have no choice but to walk to the Crisis Center. They wait outside on the benches along the walkway, staying six feet apart. This waiting area is covered by a roof, but it was very much exposed to the elements on one side. People waiting were getting wet and cold on days of miserable, windy, rainy and snowy weather. We hated to see them trying to stay warm and dry.

Sam Jones, a Knight of Columbus and longtime volunteer, saw the problem and responded without delay. He and two brother Knights installed large, heavy-duty tarps below the roof line to act as a wind barrier. It has made a big difference in protecting people from the weather.

The Hospitality Room at the Crisis Center has also remained open during the pandemic. It is a day shelter for men and women who are homeless, offering food, showers, and laundry services. Since there are strict limits on how many people can be inside at one time, visitors to the Hospitality Room also appreciate this modification to our outside waiting area.

We highlight this project to show how a simple idea and a little effort can have a positive impact on many people.

To Sam and his fellow workers, we extend a heartfelt “Thank You!”

Each day we are getting closer to the time when pandemic precautions are no longer necessary. The effort of every single person to stay healthy and to slow the spread of the virus brings all of us closer to that time.

May God bless you as you do your part!

Men with Hope and Purpose

The Joseph House Workshop is a long-term residential program for men who were homeless. It help them advance toward gainful employment and healthy new lives. Here is an interview with Nick, Assistant Director, who is also a Workshop graduate:

How many men are in the program? We have 4 men here now; one is in the employment phase and three have just started taking classes.

How has the COVID-19 pandemic affected the program? The only changes here at the Workshop because of COVID-19 are that we do temperature checks and the residents do not go to outside meetings as they would have before the pandemic.

What part of the program are the men especially grateful for? The men are especially grateful for the chance to receive the tools to see things in a different way. They appreciate the kindness and love that they receive from the Workshop and all associated with Joseph House. They love the opportunity to “give back” to the community by way of community service over at the Crisis Center and helping the Sisters at the convent.

What are some of their goals? Their goals are gaining the ability to be self-sufficient, to stay off drugs and alcohol, rebuilding family relationships, obtaining a job and learning how to keep it, learning about building credit, getting a car and house. The resident in the employment phase is reaching every goal he has set here, he even says that he surprises himself on how much he has turned his life around with the help of Joseph House Workshop—he has held a job, started college, and is doing great in rebuilding his relationship with his wife and kids. Those who are starting classes are setting short-term goals to work on.

How are their lives different today compared to how they were before entering the Workshop? The biggest difference is that they have HOPE now, they have a PURPOSE.

Do you hear from former residents and graduates? Yes, we like to stay in touch. We believe everyone benefits from the program in different ways. They hold jobs and some have even started their own business. It’s heartening to see people rebuild their lives. The Workshop is a turning point for them.


The Joseph House Workshop was the final program that came into being through the vision and leadership of our founder, Sr. Mary Elizabeth Gintling.

To celebrate the Workshop’s 15th Anniversary in 2020, three of the current residents wrote letters of appreciation addressed to Sister. Although they never met her, the men nonetheless are reaping the benefits of her lifetime of service:

“Dear Sr. Mary Elizabeth, My name is Andrew, a resident at the Joseph House Workshop. I am very grateful for all that you have done. The program has given me my life back. I owe everything to this program, from my relationship with Christ, family, and learning what it means to love and serve others. Thank you with all my heart.”

“Sr. Mary Elizabeth Gintling, I first want to thank God for your love of wanting to help those who are less fortunate than others. What a blessing you are. I thank you for the Joseph House—it was not only a blessing for me, it saved my life in so many ways. Words cannot express my thank you. But now I know you are in God’s loving arms, grace, and hope for all you did while here. Thank you. – Thomas”

“The Joseph House Workshop has been one of the best decisions I have made in my whole 55 years in life. It was an experience that I grew closer to God like I have never been before. A group of guys trying to do the right thing and also accepting God in our lives. It has not been easy or hard, just trying to follow God’s will. Thank you Sis Mary Elizabeth for a place that made me a man fit for society. Love you for giving me a chance. Amen. – Maurice”

Sr. Mary Elizabeth and contractor Ron Alessi with plans for the Workshop, ca. 2004.

Read more about the program here: Joseph House Workshop

Be sure to read other posts about the Workshop:
A New Look at the Workshop
Building Success, One Little Piece at a Time
Look Up For A Sign
Newsletter: June 2018

Music Recommendation: Light for the World

Music is a shortcut to the soul—and a new album from one of the oldest communities of religious women offers a reminder of that.

The Poor Clares are contemplative nuns who belong to the Franciscan family. Their founder was St. Clare of Assisi, who lived from 1194 to 1253.

A group of these nuns in England, the Poor Clares of Arundel, have recorded an album of heavenly music entitled Light for the World.

Light for the World combines Gregorian chant with subtle and relaxing music. The production strikes a balance between old and new, which will help to introduce the chants to modern listeners. Playing the album will create an oasis of peace and calm in your day. It will reacquaint you with the healing power of beautiful sounds and uplifting words.

The album features traditional hymns such as “Ubi Caritas” and “Veni Creator Spiritus.” Of special interest are new songs based on the writings of St. Clare and St. Francis, which have been set to music by composers James Morgan and Juliette Pochin.

Released by Decca Records in October of 2020, Light for the World is available from music retailers and online streaming services. It was a No. 1 best-seller in the Classical Music Charts. We highly recommend it.

Here is a trailer for the album from YouTube:

Here is the website for the Poor Clares of Arundel: https://www.poorclaresarundel.org


If you decide to purchase the album from Amazon, consider starting with our Amazon Smile link (http://smile.amazon.com/ch/52-0846802). That way, you will be supporting both the Poor Clares in Arundel and the Joseph House.

It’s also a good idea to support local businesses. Here is a site to help you find an independent record store: https://recordstoreday.com/Stores


The Poor Clares recording ancient music for modern times.

For many years (1977-2011), we operated Joseph House by the Sea, a book and gift store in Ocean City, Maryland. Our founder, Sr. Mary Elizabeth Gintling, believed it was important “to have a place in the marketplace where people can come to get spiritual direction and guidance in their reading.” In that spirit, we continue to offer recommendations for worthwhile items.

Newsletter: February 2021

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

February 14 is of course Valentine’s Day, but the day has another special meaning for us in that it’s the birthday of the Joseph House Crisis Center.

It was on February 14, 1984, that the Crisis Center officially opened, the beginning of a new era for the Joseph House ministry. The building where it’s located also received a new lease on life. Back in the early 1980s, the structure (a small warehouse) was being used to store voting machines for Wicomico County. The county was renting the property from the Campbell Soup Company, which used to have a plant in Salisbury. Through the diligent efforts of the mayor’s office and community leaders, use of the building was given to the Joseph House.

Although the building was a tremendous gift, and we desperately needed the space, it was far from being ready for its new purpose. As noted in the February 1984 edition of this Newsletter, what was to be the future home of the Joseph House possessed only a leaky roof, cement floors, and cinder block walls. In other words, “It was a start from scratch project.” But thankfully, many people rose to the challenge of the renovation, a testimony to their concern for the less fortunate.

The project took about three months under the supervision of Jim Berrigan. Local businesses donated supplies and tennis promoter Bill Riordan covered the extra costs. According to our Newsletter, “Almost all of the ordinary construction work was done by jobless men who had come to us for help. How fitting that the haven for the poor should be built by the hands of the poor.”

Home renovation TV shows are common today, and we are used to seeing people walking through “oohing” and “aahing” at all the marvelous changes. Well, that gives you an idea of what Opening Day was like. Here’s more from our Newsletter archive:

“We had set February 14th as our opening day, and although it was not quite finished we opened at 9:30 A.M. There was a considerable group that attended, and each person who entered was pleasantly surprised at the space, convenience and warmth of our new quarters…We noted that the most surprised persons were the two gentlemen who secured the use of the building from Campbell Soup. They were flabbergasted at the change.”

The Crisis Center before the renovation.
Opening Day, February 14, 1984. Our founder remarked, “God has really worked a first-class miracle here.”

In the history of the Joseph House, building projects are a recurring theme. St. Joseph is our patron, after all. The transformations involving wood and brick are only part of the story, however. A change also occurs in the people who bring to life the Crisis Center and our other ministries. “I am not the same person I was,” they often say.

Our founder, Sr. Mary Elizabeth, was well aware of this. She once said:

“One of the great joys that I had is that many of the people who come here to volunteer…have changed their attitudes about the poor completely, and have become people who are seeking for justice and peace….Without any arguments, without trying to persuade people, they have simply seen by the way of life that they adopted, after they came to help, that the world wasn’t the way it was when they first came.”

These personal transformations are not surprising because every instance of loving and serving the poor is an encounter with Christ.

The Crisis Center is a symbol of hope in more ways than one. Its creation and birth is a story of how government, businesses, religious groups, and private citizens all worked together on behalf of those in need. Its mission continues through your support. Sr. Mary Elizabeth articulated this mission very simply: “We do anything that the poor need. We are free, that’s the beauty of our work. We are absolutely free to do anything that the poor person needs.”

Freedom has a purpose, to do what is right and good, and Sister wanted our freedom to be used to help stabilize family life. We do this by offering assistance to people facing crisis situations.

Cassandra and her family experienced a real nightmare. A fire destroyed their mobile home in the middle of the night (it was caused by a space heater). No one was injured, but all of their belongings became a burned and soggy mess. After being assisted by the Red Cross for two days, this family had nowhere to go. We paid for a week at a motel ($392), gave them groceries, a gasoline voucher, and a small sum of cash, and provided Christmas gifts for the four young children. Cassandra does condominium cleaning to earn a few hundred dollars per month. She used the week in the motel to find another place to rent.

Gabe, 37, got sick with COVID-19 and was not able to work for a while. His wife is pregnant and does not have a job. Gabe’s unemployment was delayed and he needed rental help to avoid being evicted. We sent $313 to his landlord.

Sofia and Ken have five children and are homeless. They have been living in motels for a few months. Sofia lost her job at a school because of the pandemic. Ken is also unemployed. With their money running out they needed help paying for a motel over Christmas. Sofia was scheduled to return to work in January. We paid the motel bill of $392.

Katrina, 29, a single mother of two, has also been living in a motel (for eight months). She works at a pizza place, earns about $300 per week, and almost all of it goes to the motel. We paid for one week to help her save for an apartment.

2020 CRISIS CENTER RECAP

Last year, more than ever, we had to abandon ourselves to the Providence of God. Like everyone else, we had to adapt quickly to changing circumstances brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. The Crisis Center remained open and we implemented safety protocols, namely mask wearing and social distancing. Out of necessity, the Soup Kitchen was closed in March because it lacked the space to keep patrons safely apart (it won’t reopen until the virus is under control). Overall, less people visited us than in previous years, probably because they received a stimulus check and/or extended unemployment benefits. But these relief efforts only go so far—when people really need help, we are here for them.

The pandemic touched us directly in December when a staff member tested positive for the virus (which had been contracted elsewhere). Out of an abundance of caution we closed the Crisis Center for ten days, but no additional infections occurred. The staff member was hospitalized and has since recovered. We reopened the week before Christmas, with plenty of time for our Christmas gift distribution. Thank you for your support of the Crisis Center!

1,118 checks and payments were issued to assist with critical needs; 4,505 hot meals were served; 5,232 bags of groceries were given out; 308 households per month (on average) received food; 3,838 requests were made for services at our Hospitality Room for the Homeless (showers, laundry, clothing, food); 138 winter coats were given away; 415 children received Christmas gift bags.

LENT BEGINS FEBRUARY 17

“When you pray, do not be like the hypocrites, who love to stand and pray in the synagogues and on street corners so that others may see them. Amen, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you pray, go to your inner room, close the door, and pray to your Father in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will repay you.” (Matthew 6:5-6)

Many of us are spending more time alone than usual because of the pandemic. During this time of avoiding large gatherings, the words of Jesus from the Gospel remind us that God is always with us. If there are habits and activities that distract us too much in solitude, perhaps we can fast from them periodically and rest in the sanctity of our “inner room.”

The three pillars of Lent are prayer, almsgiving, and fasting. If you need special prayers for a particular need, please let us know. We will add our prayers to yours: Contact Form

The work of the Joseph House depends on private donations. Your support is gratefully received: Donate

As God changes us, we change the world in which we live. We get a little bit closer to a world of harmony and peace and of just being good neighbors to each other. Our dedication to the poor, the sick, marginalized, and vulnerable will always keep us on the right track. Let us continue to make this journey together, as faithful friends united in our care for all of God’s children.

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary