Newsletter: June 2022

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

Home is where we love and take care of our families. For Charles de Foucauld, family meant everyone.

Our freshly-sainted Br. Charles saw himself as a brother to all people, a “universal brother” as he called himself. Deep in the desert lands of Algeria where he lived, he was equally a brother to the nomadic people known as the Tuaregs, to the enslaved people he redeemed from bondage, and to the French soldiers garrisoned in the Sahara. His love went out to everyone, no matter who they were or what they believed or what they did. Always ready to share what he had—food, medicine, or his time—each stranger was welcomed at his door as a beloved family member.

Br. Charles wrote a rule of life for a religious congregation (that never formed until after his death), and included this directive for its members:

They will have no ‘preferences among people.’ May their universal and brotherly charity shine like a beacon for all around. Let none of those, near or far, sinner or infidel, be unaware that they are universal friends, universal brothers who spend their life praying for everyone without exception and doing them good. Their fraternity [home] is a port, a refuge where all people, especially the poor and destitute, are always fraternally invited, desired, and welcomed.

This is a beautiful description of hospitality and it’s what we try to emulate at the Joseph House since we look to Br. Charles for inspiration. People don’t exist as abstractions, however, and neither can our love for them. A member of Br. Charles’ aforementioned congregation, Antoine Chatelard, pointed this out:

Being a universal brother is first about being a brother, before thinking about being universal. . . . Universal love doesn’t exist outside of the particular. It means loving the person who is right in front of me, not loving the idea of someone I have never set eyes on.

Antoine, who died last year at the age of 90, was a great student of Br. Charles. He understood that Br. Charles’ life was a series of conversions, that having high ideals is one thing but living them out is another. Sainthood doesn’t happen without perseverance. If we want to be “universal” in our love for other people, there is only one way to start and one way to proceed . . . love the person right in front of us.

But what if that person has hurt us or caused harmed? One of our volunteers at the Joseph House Crisis Center, Gerry, met someone who revealed the depth and power of the human heart. Here is the story from Gerry (please note it describes a serious traffic accident):

Last September, Frank and Roberta were on their way home from dinner. While traveling 55 miles per hour on a two-lane highway, their motorcycle struck another motorcycle that pulled out from a stop sign and stopped right in the middle of the road.

The passenger on the second motorcycle was killed. Both Frank and Roberta were pronounced dead at the scene—but upon further inspection both still had life and were rushed to the hospital.

Their injuries were horrific. Roberta has had hip surgery and is scheduled for major back surgery. Frank’s arm was shattered so severely that his elbow ended up adjacent to his shoulder! His pelvis needed to be removed. I saw the pictures and was nauseous as I have never seen such devastation.

Neither Frank nor Roberta have been able to work since the accident and have another 9 to 12 months of recovery ahead of them. Frank has worked feverishly with his mortgage company to avoid foreclosure or eviction, and only due to help from family members was able to keep his electric on. He came to the Joseph House simply to get help with keeping his phone, cable, and Internet service from being shut off ($300).

The remarkable thing that struck me was Frank’s positive attitude about doing everything he could to get back to work. But the more AMAZING thing was the GRACE he exuded when he told me that despite the devastating injuries, he held no ill feelings toward the person that caused the accident, saying that it was “not my call” and that he believed something good could come out of this tragedy.

Having been raised in a Christian life for 60 years I’ve frequently heard that we must all show the love of Christ to others by forgiving those who cause us harm. But I have never had the privilege of seeing someone live that commitment.

Frank changed my life!

We want to thank Gerry for sharing this story with us. Love can be brought into any situation and our heart can be opened to any individual. If we feel like we can’t, we just have to do what we can and let God do the rest.


We are happy to be part of the “Br. Charles family” that extends across the globe. His example has guided our little community and helped us understand our vocation as Little Sisters. But now he belongs to everyone: his recent canonization is a declaration that his life has teaching value for all people.

Although Br. Charles lived more than 100 years ago, he can tell us something about living the Gospel in today’s world. That’s the mystery of God’s providence: when the time is right we are given what we need.

We will share more with you about the canonization next time—including an eyewitness account from our Sr. Virginia!

Thank you for your faithful support of our ministry to those in need. With gratitude,

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary


Do you have a special need you hold close in your heart? Please send us your prayer requests and we will add our prayers to yours: Contact Form.

Your support of our ministry helps the hungry, the homeless, and struggling families. See how you can help: Donate.

Our featured community member this month is Sr. Connie Ladd. She has been with the Little Sisters the longest. Read her profile and see photos here: Sr. Connie.

Charles de Foucauld: The Timeline of a Saint

Born to a noble family, a tragic childhood, worldly preoccupations, a loss of faith, and then . . .
Charles de Foucauld’s life changed in 1886 with a powerful conversion experience, but this was just another step in a journey with God that was already underway. Charles later realized that God had always been with him:

“O my God! How surely you had your hand on me, and how little I felt it! You are so good, you took such good care of me! How closely you were keeping me under your wings, while I didn’t even believe you existed!”

In the years that followed, Charles sought nothing but to live for God alone. He desired to imitate the hidden life of Jesus in Nazareth, and this ultimately led him to the Sahara and an apostolate of friendship as a “universal brother.”

Charles de Foucauld will be canonized a saint on May 15, 2022. Here is a look at important dates in his life, a life which traveled a circuit between his native France, the Holy Land, and North Africa.

September 15, 1858 – Born in Strasbourg, France
1864 – Orphaned, taken in by maternal grandparents
1876 – Enters Saint-Cyr military academy; acquires the nickname “Piggy” for his self-indulgent lifestyle
1878 – Enters cavalry school at Saumur
1881 – Serves in Algeria
1882 – Leaves the army
1883-84 – Explores Morocco in disguise (the country is closed to Christian Europeans)
1885 – Receives the Gold Medal from the Geographical Society of Paris
Late October 1886 – Seeks counsel from Fr. Henri Huvelin in Paris; has conversion experience
1888-89 – Pilgrimage to the Holy Land
1890 – Becomes a Trappist monk at Notre Dame des Neiges in France; a few months later, seeking greater asceticism, he transfers to a monastery in Syria, Notre Dame de Sacré Coeur
1897 – With permission from the abbot, leaves the Trappists
1897 – Wanting to live the “hidden life” of Jesus, becomes a handyman for a convent of Poor Clare nuns in Nazareth
1900 – Returns to France to study for the priesthood
June 9, 1901 – Ordained a priest for the Diocese of Viviers
1901 – Receives permission to return to Algeria, settles in Béni-Abbès; begins ministry of prayer, charity, and friendship to all
1905 – Travels hundreds of miles south to Tamanrasset, a rugged, desolate land; builds a place to live, becomes known as a marabout (holy man)
1915 – Due to the unrest following the outbreak of World War I, builds a small fort in Tamanrasset to protect the local people from pillagers
December 1, 1916 – Shot and killed by a raider at the gate of his fort
1921 – First biography is written
1927 – Cause for beatification begins
November 13, 2005 – Beatified by Pope Benedict XVI
May 15, 2022 – Canonized by Pope Francis

The canonization Mass is scheduled to be televised on EWTN on Sunday, May 15, 2022, at 4:00 AM (live) and again at 12 noon.

Below is a picture gallery depicting the life of Charles. Click on each picture for a larger image.

Newsletter: May 2022

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

A few months ago, three of us were at a gas station on a rainy morning in late winter when a familiar face appeared. It was Gregory, looking cold and a little down. The Sister at the wheel rolled down the car window.
“Hi Gregory, how are you doing?”
“Hi Sister. You know, my brother is in bad shape. He was in an accident and he’s not doing good. They took them to that place in Baltimore, uh . . .”
“You mean Johns Hopkins?”
“Yeah. You know, I need a little money, ten dollars, for a bus ticket, so I can get to my father and then we can go see my brother.”
Sister started reaching into her pocket when Gregory continued: “I haven’t eaten anything today, maybe you could make that twenty.”
Sister held up a folded twenty dollar bill. “Here you go, Gregory. We will pray for you and for your brother. We hope everything goes well.”
Gregory thanked us, and then we watched him shuffle into the gas station to get whatever nourishment he could find.
“Well, that’s what the money is for,” Sister said, and we continued on our way.

Jesus taught that “whatever you do to the least of My brothers and sisters you do to Me” (Mt 25:40). This Gospel verse is fundamental to the mission of the Joseph House. Like you, we believe in what Jesus said, and God will check on how much we believe it in the daily unfolding of our lives. But of course, it’s not always easy to be ready. It can be just as hard to see the presence of Christ in a family member when our patience is worn thin as it can be to see Him in a poor man asking for money in the rain.

Throughout history, this verse from Matthew 25 has tested believers on what their faith really means in their day-to-day living. It brings heaven down to earth and reminds us that our beliefs need to be expressed in how we live. Near the end of his life, Charles de Foucauld, the spiritual father of the Joseph House and the Little Sisters, wrote to a friend that nothing in the Gospel made a deeper impression on him or changed his life more than this verse. It changed his life at the root. Does it change ours?

As Little Sisters, our meeting with Gregory is typical in our lives. We turn around and there is someone next to us, or at the door or on the phone. Our founder Sr. Mary Elizabeth said, “Whoever God sends that day is of His doing. We must lovingly and willingly meet the poor and their needs. We cannot grow cold, even though we become tired and overwhelmed with so many people.” All of us, no matter who we are, will encounter people, often unexpectedly, who cry out in so many ways for a little love, patience, and understanding. These are sacred moments. Let’s be ready with a smile.

We are grateful for your support of the Joseph House. Your generosity makes a huge difference to people at the end of their rope. Thank you for being a good friend. Your fidelity allows our mission to go on.

Lisa, 47, is another familiar face that showed up recently, this time at our Crisis Center. She lives in a very poor section of town and has a rare blood disease. She must go to Baltimore frequently for treatment, although there have been times when she couldn’t afford to do so. Lisa is always on the edge of destitution; she never has enough money for any of her basic needs, like housing, utilities, or food.

A few years ago, Lisa received an education grant to become a licensed practical nurse. Despite feeling weak and out of commission, she was determined to provide for herself. It didn’t work out, however, not just because of her health, but she was born with a slight learning disability. The cards seem stacked against her.

Lisa is unfailingly polite and unassuming, displaying the remarkable fortitude of someone tried by adversity. Her latest need was a cut-off notice from the electric company. We paid the whole bill ($343) since there was no chance her meager Social Security income would cover any of it. Lisa is yet another reminder that we must look out for each other as one Body in Christ.

Christy, age 50 and a widow, was a newcomer and had many problems. She and her daughter were forced out of their rental because their landlord was being foreclosed. Suddenly homeless, Christy was trying to cope with the turmoil. She is being treated for cancer and her weakened health makes everything more difficult. She lost some of her important papers and this was delaying her assistance from the state. We gave her three nights in motel ($234), groceries, a gasoline voucher, and cash for meals.

Maybe it’s our memories of the school year and the approach of summer vacation, but the month of May always brings a happy feeling of anticipation. We are extra excited this year because, as we have mentioned before, Charles de Foucauld is being canonized a saint on the 15th. And we are extra, extra excited because our own Sr. Virginia will be attending the ceremony in Rome!

Sr. Virginia will be part of a small group of pilgrims led by a long-time friend of our community, Fr. Lennie Tighe, who is an authority on Br. Charles. We are so happy that Sister will be there to represent us; she will be our eyes and ears and we can’t wait to hear her eyewitness account of this momentous occasion, which we will share with you.

The canonization Mass is scheduled to be televised on EWTN on Sunday, May 15 at 4:00 AM (live) and again at 12 noon.

Our joy is tempered by the war in Ukraine. Let us pray for peace and be ambassadors for peace to each person we meet. May the goodness of God be with you.

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary


We offer you the promise of prayer. Please send us your special intentions and we will pray for you: Contact Form.

Your gift, no matter the size, helps people in need of food, shelter, and other basic necessities. Learn how to make a donation: Donate.

Newsletter: April 2022

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

How would you describe the time in which we live?

Scientists say we are in the Anthropocene Epoch, a time when human activity dominates the planet. Technologists say we are in the Information Age, with the Internet and smartphones bringing the world to our fingertips. If you keep up with the news you might be tempted to say we are in the End Times. That’s being pessimistic, and the end of the world has been predicted many times before in the past, but it can feel like it, doesn’t it?

In his book, Our Lady of Holy Saturday, Cardinal Carlo Martini suggests instead that we are living in the “Holy Saturday of History,” a time of confusion and dashed hopes.

Holy Saturday is different from the rest of Holy Week. There are no strong images associated with it: there is no palm waving as Christ enters Jerusalem, no washing of feet or breaking of bread, no betrayal with a kiss, no crucifixion. It’s a day of silence, caught between extreme darkness and light. It’s the Sabbath day following Christ’s Passion.

Cardinal Martini has a point. Since all around us we see signs of God’s absence, Christ is still entombed, or so it seems. In the movie Groundhog Day, February 2nd gets repeated over and over again. For us, it’s Holy Saturday, and the sunrise of Easter morning never appears to arrive.

How do we live during this time, when fear and dread threaten to rule the day? As indicated by the title of his book, Cardinal Martini directs us to the example of Mary, the mother of Jesus. In Scripture, Mary is a woman who remembers. She proclaims in her song of praise, “The Mighty One has done great things for me, and holy is His name” (Lk 1:49). And then at Bethlehem, when the shepherds gathered around the manger with stories of angels, Mary “kept all these things, reflecting on them in her heart” (Lk 2:19). And yet again Scriptures records that she “treasured all these things in heart” (Lk 2:51), this time at Nazareth, following an eventful trip to the temple where the Child Jesus was found teaching the elders. Nothing passed by in Mary’s life without a deep, contemplative gaze at its meaning.

This same type of holy remembering can serve us well too:

“We have all had the experience of being able to perceive the presence of a strength that accompanied us in times of difficulty, even if we did not feel it when we suffered and it seemed to us that we did not possess it. It may seem to us sometimes that we have been abandoned by God and by our fellow human beings, and yet, when we look back over the events that have just passed we realize that the Lord had continued to walk with us, and had even carried us in His arms.” (Our Lady of Holy Saturday, pp. 34-35)

Mary became the Mother of Hope on Holy Saturday because the memories in her motherly heart nurtured the conviction that God will not abandon us. Look back over your own life: we pray you can find the same consolation.

Our acts of love give witness to hope, and every seed of goodness planted creates a sense of communion. Then the truth becomes more believable: God is with us and always will be.

Your support of our ministry is helping people in need know that they are not forgotten. Here are a few of the people your contributions have assisted:

Marcus, 60, fell into a tailspin after his wife died. He lost his job and then his apartment. For about a year he was homeless, going back and forth between shelters and the street. Marcus credits therapy with saving his life. He found a job at a grocery store and with $400 from the Joseph House he was able to move into a new place to live.

Ana, 51, is a hard-working single mother. She works in the evening doing cleaning work and must take her young daughter with her since she cannot afford a babysitter. Ana contracted COVID-19 and lost 18 days of work. It was devastating to her budget. We sent $350 to the electric company to stop a cut-off. Ana lives in a dingy trailer park; she dreams of moving away.

Kelsey, 33, has a son and is also caring for her sister’s three children because her sister was arrested. Kelsey works at a low-paying job making pizza. The water was turned off in her home because she could not afford to pay the bill. We paid the amount due ($340).

Paige, 29, is the mother of three children. The youngest was born with cerebral palsy and requires many doctor visits and additional care. This was too much for the father of the child and he left. Paige said they were engaged to be married. She is a very loving and responsible parent and is doing the best she can. Her only income is her child’s Social Security check, which covers the rent and not much else. We paid $400 toward Paige’s overdue electric bill.


When the Risen Christ appeared to the disciples, His first words were, “Peace be with you.” We are writing this in early March and we fervently pray that the people of Ukraine will know peace and that all wars will end. May God have mercy on us.

Thank you for your support of the Joseph House. We hope your celebration of Easter renews your spirit. And let us continue to love and pray for one another.

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary


If something is weighing heavily in your heart please know that you are not alone. We will pray for you and your special intentions: Contact Form.

Did you know that by making a small donation you can make a big difference in the life of someone in poverty? Learn how you can help: Donate.

Our featured community member this month is Sr. Jennifer. She has a fun way of staying active. Read her profile here: Sr. Jennifer.

Newsletter: March 2022

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

We are eagerly awaiting the canonization of Charles de Foucauld in May when he will be declared a Saint. We will always think of him as Br. Charles, and his life and spirituality have inspired not only our community, but communities and fraternities around the world. It’s a global family. You may know that he was beatified in 2005 (that is, declared “Blessed”), but did you know that there is another member of this greater Br. Charles family who has also been beatified? Her name is Sr. Odette Prévost, and she was beatified in 2018.

Sr. Odette was a member of the Little Sisters of the Sacred Heart, a community that is older and a bit larger than ours. Born in France, Sr. Odette was a teacher before entering consecrated life. After professing vows with her community, she was sent to Algeria where she lived in the same poverty as the poor. She studied Arabic, became fluent, and continued her teaching work. She often made homemade yogurt for the local children so they would have enough protein.

On November 10, 1995, while on her way to church, Sr. Odette was killed by a terrorist. Just like Br. Charles, she died a violent death and in the same country where he shed his blood. She is recognized as a martyr for the faith. But it’s also important to remember how she lived. Like every member of the Br. Charles family, Sr. Odette aspired to be “little” but with a heart big enough to embrace the whole world. She was a friend and neighbor to the poor and downtrodden, the favorites of the Lord’s flock. A prayer was found with her when she was killed, and it has the same spirit of surrender as Br. Charles’ Abandonment Prayer. It’s more like a spiritual counsel; perhaps she wrote it as a daily reminder to entrust herself to the hands of God:

“Live today’s day. God gives it to you, it belongs to you. Live it in God. Tomorrow’s day belongs to God, it doesn’t belong to you. Do not impose today’s worry upon tomorrow. Tomorrow belongs to God, hand it over to Him. The present moment is a frail footbridge. If you weigh it down with yesterday’s regrets, tomorrow’s anxiety, the footbridge gives way and you lose your footing. The past? God forgives it. The future? God gives it. Live today’s day in communion with God.”

Sr. Odette Prévost

The present moment is our graced encounter with life. It’s all that we have. By attending to the needs of each moment, Sr. Odette—or should we say Bl. Odette—made an offering of her life that reached its fulfillment on that fateful day. She knew the danger surrounding her, but her love triumphed over fear. Although we live in a different world than she did, she has a message for us: the victory of love is for everyone.

In our work at the Joseph House, we meet people every day who are weighed down with serious and immediate worries. Maybe they don’t have enough food for their children, or there’s no heat in their home, or they can’t pay the rent and they’re going to be homeless. Many people indeed have lost their footing on the “frail footbridge” of the present moment. Thankfully, we don’t have to go through life alone. Your faithful support of the Joseph House allows us to help people during their times of crisis. They find a steady hand when they need it the most.

Gabriela, 61, has chronic asthma and other health problems. Some major changes have impacted her life recently. Her son was released from a mental health facility where he had been a resident for five years because of his schizophrenia. He had nowhere to go and moved in with Gabriela. Not long after that, her daughter died, leaving behind a daughter of her own. She also moved in with Gabriela, who is now trying to cope with her new caregiving responsibilities. The adjustment is difficult; Gabriela had been very dependent on her daughter.

This family’s only income at the moment is the son’s monthly check for $265 in temporary welfare benefits. Gabriela’s granddaughter will be getting a check from Social Security in a few weeks. In the meantime, Gabriela desperately needed help with the rent. We sent $500 to her landlord to prevent the possibility of eviction.

Annie suddenly assumed custody of four young grandchildren after their mother was incarcerated. Annie is on disability and requires daily visits from a home health aide. Two days before Christmas, we learned that Annie had no food or presents for the children. To make matters much worse, she was also facing eviction from her subsidized housing. We delivered what she needed and paid $314 toward the rent.

Dimitri, 76, suffered a brain injury after falling and hitting his head. He could not affords the co-pay on his prescriptions. We paid the bill of $137.

A few months ago, Desiree, 47, was living in a tent. She had been homeless for a year. Dreadful spousal abuse was the cause of her situation. Desiree is now living in a rooming house, but the $600 rent takes most of her monthly check. Sometimes during the summer she can get a job selling tickets at a carnival for extra money. Winters, though, are tough. Desiree lives four miles from our Crisis Center and she walks there several times a week looking for some friendly company. She herself is always very cheerful, determined to make the best of whatever happens to her. When she couldn’t pay all of her rent, we sent $300 to her landlord.


There must be something in the air . . . another member of the Br. Charles family has been honored for living an exemplary life. Last fall, Élisabeth Marie Magdeleine Hutin, founder of the Little Sisters of Jesus, was declared “Venerable” in recognition of her life of heroic virtue. There’s no doubt it: the time for “littleness” and Nazareth Spirituality is now. It’s a way of life that leads to sainthood!

Thank you for all the ways you support our work. We are so happy to share with you what is important to us. May it bring us closer together in unity of mind and heart.

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary


As we celebrate St. Patrick’s Day this month, our featured Sister this time is Sr. Pat Lennon, who entered our community in 1992. Please take a look at her profile: Sr. Pat.

The season of Lent is here once again, a time to grow closer to God and to be more detached from the things that keep us from God. It is a time to be more loving. The traditional practices are prayer, fasting, and almsgiving. These can help us be more focused on the needs of others.

If you are praying for special intentions and would like us to add our prayers too, please send us a note: Contact Form.

You can also share your blessings with those who do without by making a donation: Donate.

“For our Lenten journey in 2022, we will do well to reflect on Saint Paul’s exhortation to the Galatians: ‘Let us not grow tired of doing good, for in due time we shall reap our harvest, if we do not give up. So then, while we have the opportunity, let us do good to all’ (Gal 6:9-10). . . . Lent invites us to conversion, to a change in mindset, so that life’s truth and beauty may be found not so much in possessing as in giving, not so much in accumulating as in sowing and sharing goodness.”Pope Francis

Newsletter: February 2022

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

Feed the hungry…Give drink to the thirsty…Clothe the naked…Shelter the homeless…Visit the sick…Visit the imprisoned…Bury the dead.

These are the Corporal Works of Mercy, the basic acts of charity and kindness found principally in the Parable of the Last Judgment (Mt 25:31-46) and elsewhere in the Bible (Is 58:6-14 and Tb 1:17). They describe very accurately what we do day after day at the Joseph House. It’s a short list, but the permutations go far and wide. For example, sometimes people don’t need clothes but they have been stripped of their dignity. They may not be in a jail cell but they are imprisoned by addiction or mental illness. They may not be starving for food but they are hungry for justice. Our mission calls us to respond in whatever way we can, and thanks to your support, we have the freedom to do so.

Last month we gave a mission report on the Joseph House Workshop. Here is a look at the Joseph House Crisis Center with a few statistics from 2021:

  • 1,038 checks and payments were issued to help individuals and families pay for housing, utilities, health care, transportation, and other critical needs.
  • 2,863 bags of groceries were given out from our Food Pantry. An average of 196 households, representing 581 people, received food each month.
  • 4,899 requests for help were responded to at our Hospitality Room for the Homeless. We provided showers, laundry service, food, coats, blankets, and personal care products.
  • 5,209 bagged lunches were given to the homeless and other Crisis Center clients. Since our Soup Kitchen is closed because of the pandemic, our church partners prepared these lunches instead.
  • 287 new winter coats for children were distributed.
  • 440 gift bags for children were given out at Christmas. Each bag included a large toy, a smaller one, a book, a puzzle or activity book, assorted stocking stuffers, plus a hat, scarf, or mittens.

But not everything can be measured with a number. We always keep in mind what our founder, Sr. Mary Elizabeth, said: “When someone needs help, it’s not just the material aid, but the love that goes with it that gives healing and self-worth and a renewed hope for tomorrow.”

Love changes people, more than anything else. It’s very important to us that our mission sites be places of warmth and welcome for all people. Along with our volunteers, we listen to and treat everyone with compassion and respect. Love is what inspires you to support our work, and it is the precious gift we share with people in need.

Together with you, we can make a difference. Sally and Craig are mourning the loss of their baby. Craig works in the crabbing industry and his income goes up and down. The father of Sally’s other child is deceased, so that child receives $533 monthly in survivors benefits. Sally and Craig are depending on this right now, but it doesn’t cover the rent ($850). Sally came to our Crisis Center for help and we were able to send $300 to her landlord. Sally also met with our volunteer job counselor, who has an excellent record at assisting people find employment.

Ernestine, 66, is blind and homebound because of her frail health. Her monthly disability check is $714 and her rent alone is $650. There is practically nothing left over for her other expenses. The water in her home was cut off because of an unpaid bill. A concerned family member brought Ernestine to the Crisis Center. One of our volunteers acted quickly and called the Water Department. A promise to mail $349 was enough to get the water back on.

Jamie, 48, and her four children became homeless following an electrical fire in their rental house. They moved into a motel, but then Jamie contracted COVID-19 and was absent for three weeks from her job at a poultry plant. Unable to afford the motel, she was desperately worried. We paid the first month’s rent for an apartment ($350) to give Jamie and her children a place to stay.

John, 47, is starting over from rock bottom after serving a seven-year prison sentence. He has nothing but the clothes on his back. John is a qualified cook and secured a job at a restaurant. His starting date was delayed for a week because he had to wait for his swollen ankle to heal. He was able to find an apartment, and we paid $300 to the landlord so John could move in off the street.

The gas was turned off three months ago in the house Maureen, 54, shares with her husband. Maureen works retail at a discount store but her husband, who is over 60, is in poor health and not working. The rent takes half of Maureen’s paycheck, so it was only a matter of time before the gas bill was added to the list of things that could not be paid. The arrival of cold weather, however, made their unheated home unbearable. To help get the furnace back on, we paid $300 toward the gas bill.

Opal, 40, will need to use a rolling knee walker for two months after her leg surgery. The rental cost is $120, which she cannot afford since she cares for her disabled son and her only income is his monthly check for $820. So we paid the rental fee.

Hugh, 61, struggles with mental health and is on several strong medications. His wife is blind and also has mental health issues. They live on her monthly check for $800. The water was turned off in their home. We paid the overdue bill of $378.

Visiting the imprisoned is the work of mercy that gets forgotten the most. In years past, the Joseph House did sponsor a prison program at the former Maryland House of Corrections in Jessup. We don’t do anything like that now, but on a regular basis the Joseph House Workshop welcomes men who have been incarcerated, sometimes directly upon their release. With the help of our program, they set a new course and begin new lives.

What we do seems so little compared to the need, but our work is offered to God, whose grace does more than we perceive or imagine. Even so, we must never forget that our Lord is with all men and women behind bars, and as He told us, what we do to them we do to Him.

Thank you for your support of the Joseph House. Let’s keep on working together for the good of others—our troubled times need people who are generous with their love.

With our faithful prayers,

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary


We can all do something to help others. Take a look at this blog post by Joe Paprocki for some ideas: Practical Suggestions for Practicing the Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy.

Please send us you prayer requests so we can pray for your needs: Contact Form.

The Joseph House depends on the support of people like you. You can donate online or through the mail: Donate.

Newsletter: January 2022

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

January is the sunrise of the year, the dawn of a new beginning. For us Little Sisters, there’s a prayer we say at the start of each day, and it seems to be fitting as we go forth into another year. It is the Abandonment Prayer of Charles de Foucauld:

Father, I abandon myself into Your hands;
do with me what You will.
Whatever You may do, I thank You:
I am ready for all, I accept all.
Let only Your will be done in me,
and in all Your creatures—
I wish no more than this, O Lord.

Into Your hands I commend my soul;
I offer it to You with all the love of my heart,
for I love You Lord, and so need to give myself,
to surrender myself into Your hands,
without reserve,
and with boundless confidence,
for You are my Father.

We never know what the day will bring, let alone the year. Placing ourselves in the hands of Divine Providence is the only security possible in this world. We do know, however, that there will be a very joyous occasion this spring: on May 15, Charles will be canonized a saint!

We are so happy to finally share this news with you. Many people have been waiting for this, but as Scripture reminds us we often have to wait until the time is right for things to happen (see Ecc 3:1 or Eph 1:9-10). Sr. Mary Elizabeth, our founder, knew nothing about Charles when she was growing up, but one day, decades ago, she saw his picture and had a sudden inspiration that he would be important to her as she searched for God’s will in her life. That’s how it is with the saints: many times they are the ones who choose us because they know they can help us acquire the graces we need. We are thrilled that Charles is finally getting the official stamp of approval. He will become St. Charles, but to us he will always be “Br. Charles.”

As Sr. Mary Elizabeth learned more about Charles she discovered a kindred spirit. He became a guide on how to imitate Christ by living the life of Nazareth, of being open to people of other faiths and cultures, of loving them as children of God. “Cry the Gospel with your life,” Charles said, and Sister adopted that for her own work. He’s been a good friend to our community, and since you are friends of the Joseph House, he’s also your friend. You can watch a video about his life and find out why he is special to us by clicking on this link: Brother Charles Video Presentation.

Joseph House Workshop News

The Workshop opened in 2005. It is next door to our Crisis Center, and it allows homeless men to stay up to two years as they follow a comprehensive program to help them begin new lives. Attention is given to their education, health care, and personal development needs. They learn a variety of skills that will benefit them in their jobs and in life in general.

We currently have three men living at the Workshop. All were homeless and dealing with addiction to drugs and alcohol. They came directly from a detox center to the Workshop, where they will live in an environment that supports their commitment to sobriety.

Two of the residents are in Phase One (classroom-based) and the other is in Phase Two (employment-based) and has started working at one of the local poultry companies. They’re all doing great.

Thanks to your support, we were able to do some much needed improvements to the Workshop’s facilities. A new floor was installed in the kitchen along with two new refrigerators. Nick, the Director of the Workshop, explains how kitchen duties are handled:

“Each resident takes turns with cooking chores. They each cook for a week, which gives them experience in shopping for the menu they choose and how to make and stick to a budget. The dishes they prepare vary from pork chops to pizza. If a resident doesn’t know how to cook when he comes in, he will be given help by other residents. The purpose is to make each resident self-sufficient.

“The residents make their own breakfasts and lunches, but for dinner we eat together each night at the table. As for groceries, we go shopping every two weeks. The two residents that are cooking for those weeks make their menus and write out a shopping list and we go shopping on Monday mornings.

“We have students from UMES (University of Maryland Eastern Shore) teaching a nutrition class to the residents. I heard of the program where students gain credits to teach on the subject they are studying. I contacted the nutrition department, and after a lengthy conversation they agreed to come and teach a 12-week class on nutrition to our Phase One residents. The topics are how to prepare healthy foods, what to look for on packages, how to read nutrition labels on packages, etc.”

Below is a photo of the kitchen at the Workshop:

We are so proud of the Workshop and of the men in the program. Not everyone is willing to make meaningful changes in life, but our men are, and that takes tremendous strength and courage. Your support makes it all possible! Thank you for everything you do for the Joseph House.

With our prayers for blessings in the New Year,

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary


We would like to pray for you. Please send us your prayer requests: Contact Form.

Your support keeps the Joseph House Crisis Center and the Joseph House Workshop in operation. You can learn how to make a donation here: Donate.

Our featured community member this month is Sr. Mary Joseph, who joined the Little Sisters in 1989. You can read her profile here: Sr. Mary Joseph.

Newsletter: December 2021

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

By far our favorite Christmas decoration is the nativity scene, that representation of the birth of Christ with the Holy Family, shepherds, angels, animals, and wise men. We have more than one set up in our Salisbury convent: there’s one in the chapel, one in the dining room, and one in our basement community room. Each nativity is in a different style, but they all keep us focused on why this time of year is so special.

Most nativity sets come with a stable, but you may have seen some that place the figures in the ruins of an old building. There are crumbling stone walls and broken pillars instead of the usual barnyard structure. We always thought this was just artistic license since the Gospels don’t actually mention a stable, only a manger (a feeding trough) which became a crib for baby Jesus.

In 2019, however, Pope Francis wrote a beautiful exposition on the meaning of the nativity scene and set us straight:

More than anything, the ruins are the visible sign of fallen humanity, of everything that inevitably falls into ruin, decays and disappoints. This scenic setting tells us that Jesus is newness in the midst of an aging world, that He has come to heal and rebuild, to restore the world and our lives to their original splendor (Admirabile Signum).

It’s good to know the meaning of this symbolism. What comes to mind is a quote from Thomas Merton’s journal; addressing God after a bout of self-examination, he writes, “Yet, ruined as my house is, You live there!” Christmas is astoundingly good news. The world is in disarray as it always has been, and the difficulties of life never end. But in the midst of creation, subject to all manner of corruption, “the Word became flesh and made His dwelling among us” (Jn 1:14). God is at home—even in the mess. Does anything else bring us such hope?

Yes, Christmas is a time to celebrate, but it calls for more than just warm sentiments and consumer excess. At Bethlehem, in the mystery of the Incarnation, Christ took upon Himself our poverty and embraced our littleness. To welcome Him at Christmas is to encounter Him in the mystery of the poor, where He promised to be (see Mt 25:31-46). Look for Him in the faces of the homeless and the hungry, and you will find what is essential in life.

Dear friends, we can’t thank you enough for your support of Joseph House. Your prayers and contributions give life to our ministry. You enable it to bear fruit. You make a difference to so many people in need. We can serve them with love because of you.

Our dedicated volunteers also enable us to respond to the many cries for help we receive. It can get busy, but the work is joyful.

Sara, 61, lives alone on one of the many back roads of the Eastern Shore. Her gums have been infected for a long time, and she needs to have most of her remaining teeth removed and replaced with dentures. For many months she has been saving up for this badly needed dental work, but it was beginning to seem like an impossible goal on her fixed income. The Joseph House was able to contribute $400 so Sara can get the dentures and healing treatment she needs.

Home for Wanda, 62, is a little house not much bigger than a storage shed. She doesn’t mind the size because she is frail and must use a walker. Over the summer Wanda suffered an aneurysm and was hospitalized. While she was away, a thief had no trouble breaking into her home and stealing the money Wanda needed to pay her rent. We supplied the missing funds of $425.

Randall, 63, is a widower. He has advanced cancer and is unable to work. He started receiving a small Social Security check and food stamps, but his basic expenses are overshadowing his resources. We paid $335 toward his past-due electric bill so the power would not be cut off in his home.

Jordyn, 24, was working in a chicken processing plant, but the physical demands of her job were too much for her and she had to stop. She lives in Virginia, in a sparsely populated area, and there are few other options for employment. Before Jordyn could find another job, she missed a rent payment, and her landlord served her with an eviction notice. Although Salisbury is more than an hour by car from where she lives, Jordyn made the trip, looking for help. We called her landlord and made arrangements to assist with $400 to stop the eviction, which was scheduled for that day.

Tammy, 51, and her husband were homeless and living in their car. They both have serious health problems, but only Tammy receives a disability check; nothing is left over after the car payment, insurance bill, and buying food. Fortunately, the couple received a subsidized housing voucher, but they could not move in for several days. With the weather turning colder, we gave Tammy and her husband five nights in a motel ($350).

Coming Soon: We currently have three residents in the Joseph House Workshop, our job-preparation program for homeless men. An update on their activities will be forthcoming. Please visit our website to learn more about our ministries, What We Do, as well as Donate Online.

Thank you for letting us be a part of your lives. We are grateful for everything you do to help us in our mission to uphold the dignity of all people, especially the poor, and to assist them in their times of need.

Our prayers are with you for a blessed Advent and a happy celebration of Christmas. May the New Year bring you peace and good health.

And may your hearts rejoice always in God’s gift of love for you!

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary


As we prepare to welcome Christ with faith reborn, we offer you the gift of prayer. Please send us your prayer requests using our Contact Form.

Read the full text of Pope Francis’ document on the nativity scene:

https://www.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/apost_letters/documents/papa-francesco-lettera-ap_20191201_admirabile-signum.html


The First Nativity Scene

St. Francis of Assisi is credited with setting up the first nativity scene to help celebrate Christmas. In 1223 he was visiting Greccio, a small hilltown in Italy, where the caves reminded him of the Bethlehem countryside. Francis felt inspired. According to his first biographer, Thomas of Celano, the saint decided “to bring to life the memory of that Babe born in Bethlehem,” to see as much as possible with his own eyes “the discomfort of His infant needs, how He lay in a manger, and how, with an ox and an ass standing by, He was laid upon a bed of hay.”

Enlisting the help of a local friend, Francis set up an altar inside a rocky niche. A manger was brought in along with a borrowed ox and donkey. Friars and townspeople arrived for Midnight Mass, bringing flowers and torch lights.

St. Bonaventure, in his life of Francis, writes, “The man of God [Francis] stood before the manger, full of devotion and piety, bathed in tears and radiant with joy; the Holy Gospel was chanted by Francis, the Levite of Christ. Then he preached to the people around the nativity of the poor King; and being unable to utter His Name for the tenderness of his love, he called Him the Babe of Bethlehem.”

And in the words of Thomas, “There Simplicity was honored, Poverty exalted, Humility commended; and of Greccio there was made as it were a new Bethlehem. The night was lit up as the day, and was delightful to men and beasts…[Francis] stood before the manger, full of sighs, overcome with tenderness and filled with wondrous joy.”

People loved the way that the pages of sacred Scripture were brought to life, and the inspiration of Francis quickly spread to churches and private homes. Today, nativity scenes of all types and sizes proclaim the meaning of Christmas around the world.

Pope Francis at Greccio.

Please read this blog post by Franciscan author Murray Bodo OFM on what Greccio says to us today:

https://www.franciscanmedia.org/st-anthony-messenger/december-2018/st-francis-and-the-gift-of-greccio

Newsletter: November 2021

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

Here it is November already, and another year is flying by. It’s a special year, too, the “Year of St. Joseph,” which was declared by Pope Francis as a way to promote this saint whose example offers hope during our troubled times.

St. Joseph, of course, is very dear to us at the Joseph House. Back when she started in 1965, our founder, Sr. Mary Elizabeth Gintling, placed her ministry to the poor under his patronage. She later explained why:

I named what we did to help the poor “Joseph House” because St. Joseph was the provider for Mary and Jesus. Also, Scripture describes St. Joseph as a just man, and working for justice has always been very important to me. That lies at the heart of Joseph House.

Our founder touches upon some important ideas here, ideas which are central to our mission. Let’s unpack them a little.

As the provider for Mary and Jesus, St. Joseph speaks to us of the dignity of human work. He earned an honest living and used his gifts to be a co-creator with God of the world around him. St. Joseph served his community through his carpentry. The lives of his neighbors were improved because of what he did.

St. Joseph’s work was also directly connected to his support of family life. Why did he work hard? The number one reason was to care for the people he loved the most. St. Joseph provided a home for Mary and Jesus and everything the word “home” means: not only a place to live and food for the table, but love, acceptance, and a sense of security. The Holy Family were refugees in Egypt and then had to resettle in Nazareth. St. Joseph the provider helped his young wife and her precious Child to believe, “It’s going to be okay.”

As a just man, St. Joseph speaks to us on how to live in society. Justice is about “right” relationships: with other people, our community, and God. It involves giving to each what is due. A just person also recognizes that some debts can never be repaid: the gift of life, for example. (Try saying to God, “We’re even.”) Thus, justice requires one to be humble, merciful, and eager to make a contribution to the common good.

Sister did a great job in picking a role model for our ministry. What we have to do is live up to his name in our service to the poor. We need the prayers of St. Joseph—and we need you.

Your generosity allows our Crisis Center to help people who are struggling to provide for their families. You enable homeless men in our Workshop to begin new lives with decent jobs. Together, we stand in for St. Joseph in so many ways.

Lillian, 39, has four children. Her husband walked out, moved to a different state, and is not paying child support. Lillian had surgery over the summer and could not work for six weeks. Her little bit of savings did not last long. When she came to see us she was penniless. Her children were hungry and the water was going to be cut off in her rental home. We paid the bill of $317 and gave Lillian bags of groceries and a gasoline voucher. Lillian’s relief found expression in tears.

Tom, 56, had to stop working at his job in food service because of his bad heart. He now has to wear a heart monitor. With his life in a free fall, Tom is hoping there’s a safety net to catch him. He has applied for government help. In the meantime, we paid his rent ($300) so he would not be evicted.

Julie, 64, lives on a fixed income. She spends about $200 per month on prescription medications. Julie calmly explained how most of her health problems began after the near-fatal complications of her knee surgery. She was behind in her rent and in danger of losing her subsidized housing, so we paid the $273 that was due.

Laura, 41, is mentally challenged and receives disability. She is the caregiver for her 100-year-old grandmother. Their guardian angels must be working overtime. Laura had a disconnect notice from the gas company. We were able to pay the amount due of $400.

CHRISTMAS CONCERT: Back by popular demand, the Magi Fund is presenting “A MAGICAL CHRISTMAS” featuring the National Christian Choir, pianist Michael Faircloth, and the Salisbury Children’s Choir. One performance only, Saturday, November 13 at 3 pm, Emmanuel Church Auditorium, 217 Beaglin Park Drive, Salisbury. All proceeds benefit the Joseph House and the Christian Shelter.

Tickets are $15 in advance, $20 at the door, available at First Shore Federal Savings & Loan (all branches) and The Country House (E. Main Street, Salisbury). Call 410-749-1633 or visit magifund.com for information.

TURKEYS AND TOYS: Your donations can make this time of year a little brighter for those who are disadvantaged. Frozen turkeys and chickens for Thanksgiving are needed by November 21. Christmas toys and gifts (new and unwrapped) for children up to the age of 14 are needed by December 12. We prefer gifts that do not require batteries. Also, we cannot accept toy guns.

All donations can be dropped off at our convent at 411 N. Poplar Hill Avenue in Salisbury. Thank you for helping us. The joy of the holiday season is made complete by remembering those who are less fortunate!

It’s a great feeling to have many reasons to be thankful. Do you know what’s even better? Being the reason that someone is thankful. You are just that for all the people who receive assistance from the Joseph House. You give to our ministry what it needs: your love and concern for others. Your prayers and contributions make our work possible, and we offer you our heartfelt gratitude. To you and your loved ones we wish a Happy Thanksgiving!

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary


Do you have special prayer intentions? We would love to add our prayers to yours. Please send us your prayer requests using our Contact Form.

Your help is needed! The mission of the Joseph House depends on people like you. Find out how you can make a difference: Holiday Giving.

What is the Use of Proclaiming Saints?

We mention St. Joseph a lot and also Charles de Foucauld, who is set to be canonized in the near future. But why should we care about saints? Why bother with the whole process of canonization, which may seem like a relic from the past? Cardinal Marcello Semeraro, from the Congregation for the Causes of Saints, has an excellent answer:

“To proclaim saints helps convince us that this vocation really exists, that the Gospel works, that Jesus does not disappoint and that we can trust in His word. . . . The saints don’t need our recognition, but when we appreciate them as such, we recognize the presence of God among us, and what can be more beautiful and comforting for a Christian than to feel the warmth of the closeness of the Lord?


“God is love and every expression of authentic charity has His fingerprints. But there are differences. While the heroes of this world show what a person can do, the saint shows what God can do. Canonizing one of its sons or daughters, the church is not exalting a human work but is celebrating Christ alive in him or her. Christian heroism proclaims God and spreads in the world His grace and blessing, which we cannot do without.”

Holiness comes in many forms, which is fortunate for us because we are all called to be saints. Let us pray for each other, and for all people, that we may reach our full stature as children of God. Since November is when we remember in a special way all the faithful departed, let us also pray for those who have gone before us. May we one day stand together in our heavenly homeland, rejoicing with all the saints, knowing at last just how good God is.

The image below is a close-up of one of the tapestries depicting the “Communion of Saints” at the Los Angeles Cathedral. Visit the cathedral’s website to learn more about these beautiful works of art: olacathedral.org/tapestries

Discovering a New Saint
Thomas Merton, a Trappist monk, wrote the following in his autobiography, The Seven Storey Mountain:

“It is a wonderful experience to discover a new saint. For God is greatly magnified and marvelous in each one of His saints: differently in each individual one. There are no two saints alike: but all of them are like God, like Him in a different and special way. In fact, if Adam had never fallen, the whole human race would have been a series of magnificently different and splendid images of God, each one of all the millions of men showing forth His glories and perfections in an astonishing new way, and each one shining with his own particular sanctity, a sanctity destined for him from all eternity as the most complete and unimaginable supernatural perfection of his human personality. . . .


“The discovery of a new saint is a tremendous experience: and all the more so because it is completely unlike the film-fan’s discovery of a new star. What can such a one do with his new idol? Stare at her picture until it makes him dizzy. That is all. But the saints are not mere inanimate objects of contemplation. They become our friends, and they share our friendship and reciprocate it and give us unmistakable tokens of their love for us by the graces that we receive through them.”

A discovery for Merton was the sanctity of St. Thérèse of Lisieux, the Little Flower. His autobiography contains this admission: “And not only was she a saint, but a great saint, one of the greatest: tremendous! I owe her all kinds of public apologies and reparation for having ignored her greatness for so long.” St. Thérèse became Merton’s new friend in heaven, and as a true friend she was there to help him. “It was inevitable that the friendship should begin to have its influence on my life,” he realized.

Merton entrusted to St. Thérèse the conversion of his brother, John Paul, which was successful. Shortly before John Paul departed for England during World War II, he visited Merton at his monastery in Kentucky, at which time he was baptized and received his First Communion.

Thérèse of Lisieux. “Holiness consists simply in doing God’s will, and being just what God wants us to be.”

A New Friend to Discover
On October 13, 2021, during an audience with Cardinal Semeraro, Pope Francis authorized the Congregation for the Causes of Saints to promulgate decrees regarding eight people, advancing them along the road to official sainthood.

Of these eight, one is a member of the Br. Charles family: Élisabeth Marie Magdeleine Hutin, who was recognized for her life of heroic virtue and is now honored with the title of Venerable!

Élisabeth was born on April 26, 1898 in Paris, and died on November 6, 1989 in Rome. Inspired by the life and writings of Charles de Foucauld, in 1939 she founded the Little Sisters of Jesus. Her name in religious life was Little Sister Magdeleine.

Today, the Little Sisters of Jesus number about 1,400 women from 60 countries, living in small groups throughout the world. They are noted for their blue habits (the habit of the Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary is based on theirs).

Here is how Little Sister Magdeleine described the life and purpose of her community:

“The Little Sisters ask to be allowed to live as the leaven in the dough of humanity. They desire to integrate totally with other human beings, while leading a deeply contemplative life, like that of Jesus in the carpenter’s shop at Nazareth and on the highways and byways of his public life.


“The Little Sisters identify wholly with the working class, but represent at the same time a bridge between all classes, races and religions. They must be a catalyst for worker and employer, Muslim and Christian, so that each learns to live with the other, loving with a greater love and doing away with all hatred and enmity.


“Their community life should be a living witness to Christian love, ‘Jesus Caritas.’ They will not be cloistered. Their doors will always be open, so that their communities will be a meeting ground for lay and religious who will find there deeper understanding and greater love. The Little Sisters would like to live as one with the working class, in the factories and workshops. They ask for nothing more than to be thought of as ‘workers among workers,’ as they are ‘Arabs among Arabs’ and ‘nomads among nomads,’ so that the light of Christ shines out of them, in humility and silence. In the lives of the Little Sisters we must see, from near at hand, the real face of the religious life and of the Church, the real face of Christ.”

Little Sister Magdeleine of Jesus. “God took me by the hand, and blindly I followed.”

In 1997, her Cause for Beatification was opened and she received the title Servant of God. All of this recognition given to Little Sister Magdeleine is not only a testament to her individual holiness, but an affirmation of the spirituality of Charles de Foucauld and a sign of its vitality. The life of Nazareth leads to sainthood!

The most well-known person recognized on October 13 was Albino Luciani, who in 1978 became Pope John Paul I. Although he was pope for only 33 days, during his ministry as a priest and later as Patriarch of Venice he was known for his humility and his dedication to the poor and disabled. A miracle attributed to his intercession has been accepted, and now Pope John Paul I, “the smiling pope,” will be beatified at a future date and be known as Blessed.

Pope John Paul I had a short prayer that he recited to himself, and it is a good prayer for anyone who wants to be a saint, meaning it should be a good prayer for everyone:

“Lord, take me as I am, with my defects, with my shortcomings,
but make me become as You want me to be.”

John Paul I. “In order to be saints it is not necessary to accomplish extraordinary things, perform miracles, or be privileged with very special graces. It is enough to perform ordinary works, though the commitment to and love of God are not ordinary.”

Confused about all of the steps to sainthood? Here is a helpful summary: solanuscasey.org/about-us/the-cause-for-sainthood/learn-more-about-the-steps-to-sainthood