Newsletter: June 2018

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

Money is a curious thing. It can buy books but not intelligence; finery but not beauty; entertainment but not happiness; luxuries but not culture; a house but not a home.

Money can give us what we want, but not always what we need. It is our servant, not our master.

Jesus advised us to ask for our daily bread (Mt 6:11). He also affirmed that we do not live by bread alone: our fulfillment is of a higher order (Mt 4:4). As Sr. Mary Elizabeth once said, “Some days we have much, and many days we have little. I tell the sisters, ‘much is better, but, much or little, we always have God!'”

We ask money from you to help those who have little. The people we serve lack the necessities required to live a basic, decent life. It is a matter of alleviating suffering and upholding human dignity. We try to keep money in its proper place and allow our benefactors to do the same. Money can be used for good or evil: it is our choice.

Money is called currency if it’s “in circulation.” It has power when it moves, and your donations supply the power to our operation. We can assist people only because of you. Thank you for everything you do for the Joseph House. Having a heart open to people in need is a real treasure.

Like many people who come to the Joseph House, Armand was not eligible for help anywhere else. He is 58, homebound, and a dialysis patient. A social worker came to our Crisis Center on his behalf. After paying 72% of his disability income on rent, Armand has about $200 left over each month. This needs to cover the electric, water, food, and miscellaneous household items. It’s never enough. Armand has nothing extra in his life like cable TV. We paid $200 toward his past-due electric bill.

Celine, 32, is a single mother with two children. She was working a temp job but then was let go by the employer. Living paycheck-to-paycheck, Celine quickly ran into trouble paying her bills, and the water was shut off. She went to the Department of Social Services and learned it does not assist with water bills. The next stop was the Joseph House, and since we are not bound by red tape and we understand that running water is essential, we paid $170 toward Celine’s bill.

Elda is 60 and had to stop working because of arthritis in her back. She can barely walk. At the moment, her only income is $185 a month in Temporary Disability. Elda has minimal bills, but $185 doesn’t go very far, to say the least. We sent $200 to the electric company so Elda would not lose power in her home.

Janet, 46, is separated from her husband. She recently had to have one of her legs amputated. Unable to work during her recovery, she has no income. We sent $175 in rent money to her landlord.

Christine, 56, recently obtained custody of two of her grandchildren. She is trying to get a third one because the mother is abusive. Family relationships have fractured and Christine wants to do what is best for the children. To proceed with the custody case Christine needs to have a larger apartment to house the additional child. Her current income is $1,059 per month and she pays $850 in rent. She found another apartment but needed to pay a security deposit. Her lack of spare funds made that impossible. Determined to provide all of her grandchildren with a loving and healthy upbringing, Christine came to the Joseph House. We contributed $210 toward the deposit.

Last year Sister Virginia’s art class at the Joseph House Workshop took on the task of designing and creating a sign in mosaic tile for the Workshop entryway. Three new residents were up to the challenge. The sign was completed in April 2018, just as the class was ending. Here is the story from Sr. Virginia:

“Mosaics are manly,” I said to Larry, Juan, and John, my art students at the Joseph House Workshop. “Glue and cement and breaking things with tools: What’s not to like?”

As new residents of the Workshop, the three men were still in phase one, the initial three months during which they learn how to cook, clean and cooperate in a small community of men. They also do volunteer work and take an array of skill-building and inspirational classes, including my art class, which I hope provides a bit of comic relief from their very challenging schedule.

The goal of the Joseph House Workshop, a residential therapeutic program, is to help homeless men transition to stable, productive living. We know the goal has been reached when a resident completes the program and has a steady job and the means to live independently.

When Rudy, the assistant director, learned that I was going to give a class in mosaics, he suggested we make a sign for the Workshop to replace one that was falling apart. It was a handsome sign, lovingly and skillfully made by a previous resident, but unfortunately the material was not weatherproof.

I’m not sure what the men were thinking when they heard about the project, or what they said to each other in private, but in the class they were very good sports. As the weeks went by and we were still making preparations, I would anxiously try to assure the men that things were going to get more exciting. Larry would give me a deadpan look and say, “Sister-Virginia–I-am-very-excited-about-the-project-today.” Juan often assured me that the class did indeed make him feel “manly.”

John was a bit more serious – maybe because he had the most experience – and he quietly kept the project on track and free of major blunders. In fact, John devoted many hours of his scarce free time to preparing hundreds of mosaic tiles, which needed to be broken up into a variety of sizes.

We also received help from experts in the community. Carla Lewis, a superb local mosaicist, encouraged us and offered good advice. Erin Kenny and Daniel Winn at Acme Ceramic Tile in Salisbury generously gave their time to help us select the proper materials, and they showed us techniques for producing a harmonious and pleasing design.

Fortunately, the cost of the materials – weatherproof backing board, ceramic tiles, glue and grout – was covered by an education grant that the Workshop receives annually.

As the class drew to an end, the sign was far from complete. I was resigned to handing over the unfinished project to the next cohort of men, due to begin class in the fall.

My students were now preparing to enter phase two – the period during which they find training and employment, with the ultimate goal of becoming stable and independent. I was working at the nearby Joseph House Crisis Center, when John came up to me and said, “Sister, I have to show you something.” He led me across the parking lot to the Workshop entrance.

The sign was not only finished, it was framed and installed above the doors! John had worked day and night to lay all rest of the tiles, and he then enlisted another resident, Carl, to build the frame and help mount the sign, while swearing everyone involved to secrecy so he could surprise me. I was deeply moved and thrilled!

Rudy revealed to me later that John was initially quite unenthusiastic about the mosaic project. An experienced contractor, John said that he had always insisted on getting paid in full for his work. “But when the sign was finished and I saw the expression on Sister’s face,” he said, “it made it all worthwhile.” He had experienced something profound: the joy of giving his time and talent without any thought of material gain.

The mosaic project was for me a tremendous blessing and privilege. After every class, I would feel elated. Working side-by-side with these men to create something that was handsome and useful, in such a venerable and ancient art form, felt like a tiny sharing in the timeless and blissful creativity of God.


There are many things we can do with our time and money. Few of them compare with making the world more hospitable for those who need a hand.

To all men celebrating Father’s Day, we pray that God will bless you with an abundance of love. And may everyone enjoy a happy and restful summer.

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary

Two Fundamentals about our Purpose in Life

Everyone has a vocation, that is, a particular calling and purpose in life. Growing up, we ask ourselves the same questions: Why am I here? Why am I alive at all? What am I to do?

We instinctively realize that our lives must have meaning. We seek knowledge, relationships, experience. Something calls us onward.

For many people, learning their vocation is a process, guided by heart-felt desires and the choices they make. We don’t always follow a straight line, but there is no law that says we must.

Over time our lives move in a certain direction. We reach a point where we have an “existential inability to be, become, and do otherwise.” *

Each member of the Little Sisters started from a different place, and the winding roads they followed led them to our community. Sr. Connie Ladd did not join us until she was in her forties. Her path led first to marriage, motherhood, and a teaching career.

Sr. Connie with Bishop Robert Mulvee, back when she was a novice.

“In the secret of my heart teach me wisdom,” we read in Psalm 51. In our heart-to-heart talks with our Creator, the journey ahead becomes clearer, or at least the next step. Sr. Connie once put into words the fruit of her quiet communion with the Lord. She wrote a prayer that expresses gratitude for her vocation, and also her hopes and aspirations.

Her prayer reveals two fundamentals about vocations. First, we are never alone in our journey. God, the Author of Life, is the One who calls. God is our collaborator and ultimately our goal. Second, our vocation is not just for ourselves, but for others too. No matter our state in life, we are called to place our gifts at the service of others.

Prayer for a Servant of God

My Lord, God of Mystery and Awe, Your choice of servants amazes me. You could have chosen from among those much more wise and talented, yet You have called upon me.

I am honored by this opportunity to be Your servant by being of service to my brothers and sisters. In Your invitation to serve, I realize that I am drawn into a special relationship with You, my Lord and my God.

May my vocation to religious life in the community of the Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary be for me a means of grace and of building up the Body of Christ.

May I serve with humility and honor, seeking not my own advancement or self-acclaim, but rather to give glory to You and to work for the coming of the Kingdom.

Help me, I pray, to do well – to do Your will – in this vocation with which You have gifted me.

Amen.


* Nemeck, Francis Kelly and Marie Theresa Coombs. Called by God: A Theology of Vocation and Lifelong Commitment. Collegeville, MN: The Liturgical Press, 1992.

A Community in the Footsteps of Br. Charles

Our founder used to say, “A community is not so much a group of people living together to love Christ as it is a group of people loving Christ together.”

Being together physically to form a community is not always possible. Distance can keep people apart, not to mention their commitments and circumstances.

Now, thanks to the Internet, there is a new online community called the Companions of Jesus of Nazareth. It hopes to fill a need for those who desire a community in order to “love Christ together.”

This community is open to people from all walks of life – men and women, married, single, lay, ordained, and a variety of faith traditions. What unites them is a desire to become more like Jesus through an understanding of the spirituality of Charles de Foucauld, who is an inspiration for the ministry of the Joseph House.

The Companions of Jesus is under the leadership of Rev. Leonard Tighe, an authority on the life of Br. Charles and a long-time friend of the Little Sisters.

The website has more information. Check it out – this may be something you’ve been looking for:

https://www.companionsofjesusofnazareth.com

It is ironic that in our age of instant electronic communication many people feel isolated. The Companions of Jesus is using that technology to bring people together, all the while each person is living his or her own “Nazareth,” the particular place where God has planted them.

A sense of belonging is such a help to our spiritual growth. Jean Vanier, a pioneer in the healing power of communities, said it well:

We have been drawn together by God to be a sign of the Resurrection and a sign of unity in this world where there is so much division and inner and outer death. We feel small and weak, but we are gathered together to signify the power of God who transforms death into life. That is our hope, that God is doing the impossible: changing death to life inside of each of us, and that perhaps, through our community, each one of us can be agents in the world of this transformation of brokenness into wholeness, and of death into life.

Look Up For A Sign

The goal of the Joseph House Workshop is to help homeless men transition to stable, productive living. We know the goal has been reached when a resident completes the program and has a steady job and the means to live independently. There are also signs along the way that show hard work, commitment, initiative, and pride. Just look up!

Sr. Virginia explains why in her report from the Workshop:

This past winter and spring, I conducted an art class with three residents, Larry, Juan and John. They were in phase one of the program. I decided that we would create a ceramic tile mosaic for the entrance to the Workshop building. None of us had ever done anything like this and we had many false starts and changes of plan. The sign was still far from finished when the class ended. John, seen here, secretly completed the project and worked with another resident to install it over the entryway. Then he surprised me with it. I was deeply moved and thrilled!

Newsletter: May 2018

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

Sr. Mary Elizabeth Gintling, our founder, had a vision for our ministry that continues to guide us. When she started the Joseph House, she had next to nothing apart from a few principles in mind. These principles, and the rationale behind them, were explained by her in this way:

1). Joseph House helps the poor.
We wanted to help the people who fall through the cracks of the welfare system and who cannot receive help elsewhere.

2). Joseph House uses volunteers.
We wanted to give people the opportunity to share in acts of Christian charity. We also wanted to minimize operating expenses so most of our money would go toward direct aid to the poor.

3). Joseph House depends on Divine Providence.
Through the generosity of free-will donations of money, food, and other resources we wanted to avoid government funding and the restrictions and regulations that often accompany it. We wanted the freedom of the Holy Spirit in responding to the needs of the poor.

These three points are just as relevant today as they were 52 years ago when the first Joseph House opened in Baltimore on May 1, 1966. Today we carry on the good work Sr. Mary Elizabeth started, reaching out to people in need to relieve their distress, offer them hope, and uphold their dignity.

We’d like to share with you a story from one of our volunteers that beautifully ties together what Sister envisioned. Jerry has been doing amazing work helping people find employment, whether at the Crisis Center, the Joseph House Workshop, or the Village of Hope. He goes above and beyond the call of duty. A few weeks ago, Jerry met Mary in our Hospitality Room for men and women who are homeless. Mary was definitely someone who had “fallen through the cracks.” As can be seen in Jerry’s write-up, however, her life was about to take a turn for the better:

Mary had just been released from the county jail. We interviewed her, helped her get an e-mail address, created a résumé, performed on-line job searches, wrote cover letters, helped fill out job applications and drove her to interviews with prospective employers. She recently had a second successful interview with one of the employers we helped her target, and she gladly accepted their job offer. She reported for orientation a few days later.

Needless to say, Mary is thrilled with the services we provided. Our volunteers who work in this area are equally joyous each time they help one of our clients become self sufficient.

A lot has changed over the years, but “the poor you will always have with you” (Mt 26:11). For people living in poverty, the world keeps creating new barriers for them. The latest is the digital divide — the gap between those who have access to the Internet and technology and those who don’t. That was an obstacle facing Mary until Jerry helped her get to the other side.

We are so happy that the Joseph House allowed these two individuals to cross paths. And they’re just one example. The transformations that occur are life-changing — for everyone involved!

There’s something Sister didn’t mention in her vision for the Joseph House, but it’s always been present in our service to those in need: loving personal concern. She in fact set the standard. Whether in our Hospitality Room, Soup Kitchen, Food Pantry, Financial Assistance department, or at the Joseph House Workshop, our service is never simply the mechanical distribution of goods. Everything is done person-to-person, motivated by a desire to love thy neighbor.

There are many people alone and adrift with nowhere to go for help. We are here for them because of your donations.

Sybil, 51, is coping with mental health issues and living in someone’s garage. Her income is only $195 per month (Temporary Disability). Sybil came to the Crisis Center and asked for one thing: money to see a dentist. We paid $150 so she could make an appointment.

Harvey, 63, needed to move from the house he has lived in his entire life. Badly run-down, his home was returning to the elements from which it came. Mice and insects were speeding up the process. Harvey is limited in what he can do for himself. We paid $200 toward the security deposit so he could move into a place that will be easier for him to manage.

Edwina, 62, is trying to work while being treated for cancer, but sometimes the pain from radiation treatments is too much. She’s had to cut back her hours from her job in a cafeteria. With her reduced income, the rent has been taking almost all of her money. We paid $200 toward her past-due electric bill to keep the power on in her apartment.

Margot, 28, has a four-year-old daughter and newborn twins, a boy and a girl. She took a maternity leave from her job, believing that her husband would be able to take care of the bills. He, however, is a veteran and suffering from PTSD. His violent episodes became so severe that he needed to be hospitalized. The family’s income quickly dropped to zero. Margot’s landlord said something had to be paid toward the rent or else an eviction was likely to happen. We sent $300 to buy Margot some time.

The mission of the Joseph House goes forward because friends like you have been part of it from Day One. Sr. Mary Elizabeth could not do it alone and neither can we. Thank you for your donations, financial contributions, prayers, and encouragement. Learn how you can help: Donate.

We remember you faithfully every day in our prayers. You are precious to God and to us.

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary


URGENT REQUEST: We need a full-size pickup truck for our Crisis Center. The truck will be used primarily for our Food Pantry and must be suitable for heavy-duty work. Our current truck is ready to be retired after 300,000 miles of commendable service. If you can help in any way please Contact Us.

Newsletter: April 2018

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

Across the land, we see a transformation taking place: buds forming on tree branches, birds chirping in the early morning light, delicate sprouts poking through the earth. After a long winter of nor’easters and arctic cold, Spring is on the way.

Our fussing and self-importance do nothing to bring this about. A little more sunlight each day, a little warmer air in the breeze, and the magic begins. Subtle changes occur — we usually miss them and don’t realize they are happening — but what is the end result? The creation and continuation of life on our planet.

Ralph Waldo Emerson offered this advice: Adopt the pace of Nature — her secret is patience.

How patient is Nature? Look at the Grand Canyon. Some things take time and they’re never really finished. We can see this in the natural wonders of the world. Can we see it in other people? In ourselves?

In our ministry with the poor, as in any helping profession, we learn that people move according to their own timetable. We can’t hurry them along. We learn to be patient, to give them the same allowances we give ourselves. There are men and women who have been coming to our Hospitality Room for the Homeless for years. They seem resistant to any kind of intervention, no matter how well-meaning. What can we do except be the love of God for them, a love they likely experience nowhere else?

For the homeless, and everyone who seeks help from the Joseph House, our presence changes the course of their journey. Maybe the change is slow and subtle. Maybe it’s going to be a long time until someone’s winter is over. So be it. What we give to the poor is a commitment to be there for them. Fidelity gives people hope.

Week after week, we welcome people to the Joseph House Crisis Center. Our waiting room is often full. Sometimes when the cheery glow of Christmas fades away, so too does the desire to give to the needy. But the poor are still here, they still need help. It is our joy to keep our door open for them.

People like Mary Beth depend on it. She has five children, including an infant. Their home for the past several years has been a trailer. Mary Beth is married, although her husband left shortly after their youngest child was born. He is not providing support of any kind. The sudden change in finances has been extremely detrimental to this family’s security and well-being.

When Mary Beth came to see us she was on the verge of being evicted from her home. Her landlord was trying to be sympathetic, but she had reached the point where she needed to initiate legal action against Mary Beth and her family.

A grant from the Department of Social Services only paid some of the rent. Mary Beth was feeling desperate. She was scheduled to begin a new job as a nursing assistant at $9.25 per hour. Her first paycheck was weeks away, however, and she needed to pay something to her landlord immediately. The landlord was called and we guaranteed $200. That was accepted to keep Mary Beth and her children from being evicted.

For her own safety, Elena was removed from her home by Adult Protective Services following reports of domestic violence. She was placed in a motel while a social worker looked for a permanent place for her to live. Elena is 47 and in a disturbing state of declining health. She has bipolar disorder, PTSD, chronic lung disease, arthritis, and cancer.

To come face-to-face with the mystery of suffering leaves one speechless. If there is no answer for suffering, there is a response: compassion. When her motel time was up with housing yet to be found, we paid $275 for another week. Elena would be more comfortable there than in the more spartan accommodations of a shelter.

Jenny, 55, had two infected teeth that needed to be extracted. The pain, not to mention the possibility of sepsis, meant that dental care had to be soon. Jenny pays 78% of her income on rent. That leaves precious little money for other expenditures, even necessary ones. We paid $175 for Jenny’s visit to the dentist. Jenny is going to apply for subsidized housing, but the wait is usually several years.

Horace, 77, lives by himself in a small house surrounded by farmland. Early in the winter, a burst pipe kept the motor from his well running continuously. Horace got the pipe fixed, but then his electric bill was three times higher than normal. He fell behind in paying the bill and was afraid his power was going to be cut off. We sent $160 to the electric company to get Horace’s account up to date.

Tim, a 49-year-old farm worker, has been sidelined because of back and leg injuries. His teen-age son helps to pay the bills, but he is also temporarily without a job. The cold weather drove up the electric bill in Tim’s home. We paid $225 toward the overdue amount.

Derek is a successful graduate of the Joseph House Workshop. The support and training he received has renewed his self confidence, and for that he is grateful. This inner strength was put to the test a few months ago when his son was born with a heart defect. His little boy has required three surgeries at a hospital in another state. Derek missed a lot of work during these challenging months and fell behind in the rent. For the sake of his family, he came to us seeking assistance.

Being able to help Derek with $300 was gratifying. You can share in that feeling because you made it possible. Your generosity gives a helping hand to people when they need it the most. You make the world a more loving and hospitable place. If you wish to help us with a donation, you can do so here: Donate Online.

Hope is the sister of patience. While both involve waiting, hope adds a sense of expectation. Hope waits for a fulfillment not found in the present moment, and ultimately not in the present life. Sooner or later, when we trust in our own abilities we reach the end of the road. Hope tells us that is not the end of the journey.

The Resurrection of Jesus is the fulfillment of all our hopes. Please use this Easter season as a time to celebrate the many beautiful ways we can experience the gift of life. And thank you for supporting our ministry — we promise to do our best to be worthy of your faith in us.

With our prayers,

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary

The World is a Joyful Mystery

Spring is a tonic for the soul. After being cooped up inside during the winter, stepping outside to perceive the awakening land is a blessing. It feels like the flowers and grasses are not the only things coming back to life.

Sooner or later, though, we have to consider the garden chores that await us. There’s always a list of things to do: pruning, clearing, raking, planting. But perhaps not every corner of the yard needs to bear the mark of human cultivation. Pope Francis gives an example why in his encyclical, On Care For Our Common Home:

Saint Francis, faithful to Scripture, invites us to see nature as a magnificent book in which God speaks to us and grants us a glimpse of His infinite beauty and goodness.

“Through the greatness and the beauty of creatures one comes to know by analogy their maker” (Wis 13:5); indeed, “His eternal power and divinity have been made known through His works since the creation of the world” (Rom 1:20).

For this reason, Francis asked that part of the friary garden always be left untouched, so that wild flowers and herbs could grow there, and those who saw them could raise their minds to God, the Creator of such beauty.

Rather than a problem to be solved, the world is a joyful mystery to be contemplated with gladness and praise.

Here is a “before” photo of our yard. Hopefully at a later time we will have a nice “after” picture. A good portion of the yard will probably end up in its natural, untouched state 🙂

St. Francis is in our garden for inspiration.

Newsletter: March 2018

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

Home is where our story begins.

If this is true for us then it was true for Jesus when He walked the earth, born into the family of Mary and Joseph. He lived in a home created by His parents in the town of Nazareth. The house itself was likely humble in appearance, square in form and constructed of stone and clay. The roof may have served as an open-air terrace. An oven was probably outside and maybe a fig tree.

It’s interesting to note that Jewish families often kept a wooden receptacle attached to the wall by the door. Inside were strips of parchment on which were written passages from Scripture. Upon entering or leaving the house, the box was reverently touched, an indication of how a family’s dwelling place is sacred ground.

For Jesus, His home in Nazareth was more than simply a place to eat and sleep. It was a place to grow and develop. A place to feel cared for, protected, and loved. Day by day, in moments shared with Mary and Joseph, Jesus became the man we know in the Gospels.

Everyone needs a place to call home. Its importance to family life, and hence society, cannot be overstated. That’s what makes today’s lack of affordable housing so troubling. The problems of many poor families are tied directly to this issue. Forget about getting ahead — high rents, taking 50 to 80% of income, make it impossible for the poor to keep from falling behind.

People come to the Joseph House Crisis Center every week with eviction notices. According to Evicted, a book by Matthew Desmond, in the 1930s the New York Times reported on evictions as newsworthy events. Now it’s a different story: evictions occur every day in communities across the country. Desmond goes on to say:

Eviction’s fallout is severe. Losing a home sends families to shelters, abandoned houses, and the street. It invites depression and illness, compels families to move into degrading housing in dangerous neighborhoods, uproots communities, and harms children. Eviction reveals people’s vulnerability and desperation, as well as their ingenuity and guts.

We see this in our work at the Joseph House, and that is why helping families hold onto their housing is a major part of our mission. “Eviction’s fallout is severe.” Imagine all of your belongings out on the street, all of your food going to waste on the sidewalk. What would you tell your children? How would you care for them? Where do you go? What do you do? These are real questions people face.

Linda was one such person desperate to avoid losing her home. She is the mother of five school-age children. For years she worked full-time to provide a stable, supportive life for them. That changed last summer when a serious car accident injured her back. Linda is still in pain and hasn’t been able to return to work.

Linda and her children live in a subdivided house on a country lane, across from a chicken farm. She has exhausted her savings in paying the rent. When an eviction notice was posted on her door, Linda needed to reach out for help. The Joseph House was there for her, and with a $200 payment to her landlord we bought Linda some time. Her application for disability benefits is under review. Getting approved is her family’s best hope for survival, at least for the time being.

Karly, 38, is also struggling to care for her family. She is a divorced mother of three children, two boys and a girl. Karly used to work, but an arthritic condition that makes her feel pain all over her body put an end to her employment. Her two sons are disabled and their combined Social Security of $1,029 monthly provides the family’s income. The rent takes 73% of that.

One day Karly realized the kitchen and bathroom sinks plus the toilet were clogged and not draining. Leaks were sprouting from the old pipes. The landlord called a plumber, who after removing the toilet extracted a child’s toy from the drain pipe. The landlord said the repairs were due to Karly’s negligence and she needed to pay the bill of $399. Otherwise, her lease would not be renewed. Since Karly did not have the money, she appealed to the Joseph House for help. We looked over her budget with her and determined that a $200 contribution would see her through this crisis. Becoming homeless would have greatly jeopardized this family’s health.

When Angelica came to see us she had no fixed address. She and her two young daughters had used up their time at a homeless shelter. Angelica’s goal was to work with children with special needs — she was waiting for her background check to be completed. We paid for several nights in a motel as well as gas for her car.

Cassidy was anxious to leave the disreputable motel where she was living with her six children. She had seen too many rats. Previously, Cassidy and her kids were homeless, living out of her car. When Cassidy found a housekeeping job, she moved everyone into the motel. But now it was time to leave.

Unfortunately, Cassidy’s job pays very little: only $450 in the first month, although her boss has promised her more hours in the near future. Nevertheless, at the moment she had practically no options. Cassidy asked for help at the Joseph House, and we paid for a better motel for her and her family. We also gave her gas for her car and bags of groceries. Shortly thereafter, Cassidy found a suitable apartment to rent. We contributed $200 toward the security deposit so she and her children could make the move into more stable housing.

The Joseph House, of course, will help with any need as long as it can be demonstrated. Rodney, 81, is disabled and cannot walk. His 31-year-old son lives with him, but he has psychiatric problems and cannot function socially. He can do simple tasks if Rodney gives him clear-cut directions. This father and son were living without heat after they ran out of propane. We paid $200 to get the tank refilled.

Many times we help people in their immediate need, and yet their lives are still so precarious. This reminds us that their road is long and hard. Thank you for all the ways you show your love for the poor. We share with you glimpses into their lives, and we are grateful you feel close enough to care about their well-being. You make our work possible.

To make a donation now, click here: Donate Online

We are approaching Holy Week, the unsurpassed teacher on the meaning of love, where actions are as eloquent as words. Let us take it all to heart and put into practice what we can learn.

You are especially close to us in prayer. May Easter shine brightly for you, filling you with the hope and promise of Christ!

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary


It is quite true that the life of Saint Joseph and of his Holy Family, as regards to the exterior, was an ordinary, modest, unassuming life, and, we may say, a life of monotonous poverty.

But what treasures of genuine peace and true joy were hidden in its interior! In this realm no one wished to be in command or give orders, but all desired from a motive of humble love rather to obey and serve one another. And where love reigns supreme, there are peace and joy, but only there.

Fr. Maurice Meschler, SJ
The Truth About Saint Joseph

Lenten Meal Blessing

In the weeks before Easter, we are given time during Lent to put extra effort in turning toward Christ and becoming more Christ-like. There are three practices to help us in this regard: prayer, fasting, and almsgiving. They are three companions on the journey as we convert our hearts. They will help us to become more loving and charitable, more merciful and forgiving.

Meals can be an important part of our observance of Lent, especially when they are simple and bring our attention to the needs of others. Our food connects us with the earth and all the people involved in bringing what we eat to our table. Being more mindful of our food begins by thanking God for His graciousness to us. Here is an excellent table blessing to use from the book, The Work of Your Hands, by Diana Macalintal:

We bless you, Lord, and we praise you, for You have given us this meal to share, provided by the earth and prepared by human hands.

Help us to remember those who cannot eat because of poverty or sickness. Let the brief hunger we feel this Lent make us hunger even more for justice.

May this meal strengthen us to do Your will. Blessed be God for ever.

All: Blessed be God for ever.

Newsletter: February 2018

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

The Hospitality Room has been an essential part of the Joseph House Crisis Center for 20 years. It’s a day shelter for men and women who are homeless. Five days a week, they can go to the Hospitality Room and take a shower and have their clothes laundered. A big draw, especially during the cold winter months, is the hot, delicious food served by our volunteers. A steaming bowl of homemade chicken vegetable soup means everything on a frigid, blustery day.

As implied by its name, the Hospitality Room does more than provide important services. We found an excellent definition of the word “hospitality” in the book, Looking to St. Francis, by John Bohrer and Joseph Stoutzenberger:

Hospitality means a spirit of welcome and warmth that creates an oasis among us…. Hospitality leaves no room for warfare or clinging to possessions. It calls for simplicity, trust in God, and trust in other people. Just an open hand extended in greeting represents peace, welcome, and recognition of our common humanity.

It seems natural that the beloved saint of Assisi would inspire this understanding.

On a typical day, our Hospitality Room welcomes 20 to 30 people into a space that can feel a little cramped. But if you stop by you might hear laughter. Our volunteers know how to keep the peace and make everyone feel accepted. They really do make the Hospitality Room live up to its name.

Although we help people who are homeless with their material needs, we also give them a chance to simply be, away from the glare of suspicious eyes. Imagine if you were homeless and not welcome anywhere because other people looked at you with apprehension or repugnance. It’s easy to reject those who need help. If we could only see who is also being rejected (cf Mt 25: 42-45).

The Hospitality Room takes a head count every day. The grand total for last year was 4,919. That’s almost five thousand meals, loads of laundry, and showers for the homeless population of the Lower Delmarva Peninsula. The Joseph House can only do that because of your support.

Here are some other numbers from 2017:

Our Soup Kitchen served 11,544 hot meals. The Food Pantry gave out 14,298 bags of groceries to an average of 596 households per month. About 37% of the people receiving food were children.

In terms of Financial Assistance for Emergencies, we responded 1,478 times to help low-income families and individuals. We issued checks to stop evictions, pay security deposits on new rentals, pay overdue electric, gas, and water bills (often restoring services that had been cut off), and purchase heating oil and propane. When shelters were full we paid for motel rooms for families in danger of becoming homeless. Our funds were also used to buy prescription medications and medical devices, emergency dental work, mattresses and bed frames, appliances, and bus tickets. We will always consider any request as long as the need can be demonstrated.

Five struggling families received a donated motor vehicle through the Joseph House. One of these families has 11 children and through us acquired a large passenger van. These invaluable gifts allow the recipients to continue working to support themselves.

At Christmas, 722 children received a bag of gifts. Each bag included a large toy, a smaller one, a book, an activity (puzzle, coloring book, etc.), stocking stuffers, and cold weather gear (hats, gloves, scarves). We gave seven new bicycles to especially needy families. In addition, 298 new winter coats were distributed.

The Joseph House Workshop was at or near its capacity of eight residents for 2017. The men in the program, all formerly homeless, develop life skills and receive support for finding and maintaining employment. Staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week, the Workshop takes a comprehensive approach: classroom discussions cover everything from character building to interviewing techniques, neglected medical issues are addressed, recovery options continue, and transportation provided to and from job sites.

Our men find jobs and more than that: bonds of brotherhood are formed and personal growth takes root. Every step is a victory.

We hope you realize your generosity is doing more than you thought. When you give to the Joseph House you are part of a wellspring of goodwill, generated by ordinary people who want to help those in need. It’s as simple as putting “love thy neighbor” into practice — look what we can do when we work together!

Dear friend, you have our immense gratitude. Special thanks also go to: Bonnie Luna and the volunteers, performers, and attendees of the Magi Choral Festival; Bernie Greene and the volunteers and participants of the Salisbury Neighborhood Food Drive; the organizing committee, volunteers, and participants of our Annual Golf Tournament; the coalition of local churches who prepare and serve food for our Soup Kitchen; St. Francis de Sales Church; the Knights of Columbus; Sherwood Automotive; WBOC; Toys for Tots; Mason Dixon Woodworkers; and our faithful volunteers, the heart and hands of our service to the poor.

This is only a partial list. There is always the risk of leaving someone out, and it is guaranteed since many people support our ministry. Please take to heart that every offering is gratefully received and makes a real difference in someone’s life. Our deeds are an open book before the Lord, who rejoices in the love made manifest in the world. Everything done for the good of others is never forgotten.

We love hearing from you and enjoy reading the notes that many of you send. With the help of a few volunteers, we stuff our Newsletter envelopes ourselves. Many of the names on our mailing list we recognize as old friends. We wish we could get to know all of you personally. Feel free to drop us a line!

May God’s loving care surround you on these winter days. United with you in prayer, we are

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary

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