Tag: Workshop

Newsletter: February 2019

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

We rarely get the chance to do great things for other people. Our days are filled, however, with moments to do little things. These are precious and not to be squandered—they are capable of doing so much good. Sometimes the moment occurs unexpectedly. The key is to be ready at all times. We must make it the intention of our hearts to be kind and considerate of others.

Brother Charles, the spiritual father of the Joseph House, built his life around this. He wrote:

Have the tender care that expresses itself in little things that are like a balm for the heart. With our neighbors, go into the smallest details, whether it is a question of health, of consolation, of prayerfulness, or of need. Console and ease the pain of others through the tiniest attention.

Be tender and attentive towards those whom God puts in your path, as a brother towards a brother, as a mother towards a child. As much as possible, be an element of consolation for those around us, as a soothing balm, as our Lord was to those who drew near Him.

Every great saint has seen the truth and beauty of living this way. Here are words from Mother Teresa, for example:

Thoughtfulness is the beginning of sanctity. If you learn this art of being thoughtful, you will become more and more Christ-like, for He was always meek and He always thought of the needs of others. Our life to be beautiful must be full of the thought of others.

The thoughtfulness of Jesus and Mary and Joseph was so great that it made Nazareth the abode of the Most High God. If we also have that kind of thoughtfulness for each other, our homes would really become the abode of God Most High.

The little things we do for each other are so important. They make a big impact for their size. As Little Sisters, we remember this every day in our convent, our place of daily living, and also in our home away from home, the Joseph House. The sentiments expressed above speak to the essence of our ministry with the poor. What we do is nothing less than the careful, polite attention to the needs of others. And you—our friends, volunteers, and benefactors—participate in this, too. The Joseph House exists because of your thoughtful consideration of other people, especially those undergoing hardship.

Our founder wanted the Joseph House to reflect the warmth and love of the Holy Family in Nazareth. She wanted it to be a place where people receive help not just in the form of material goods and services, but in a lifting up of their spirits. The Joseph House is a place of encounter and personal contact, where people are welcomed and their dignity respected. The world is so harsh at times; people who are worried about going hungry or being evicted should be met with kindness.

Thank you for your support and for allowing us to channel your generosity. We added up the figures from 2018 and they show that the “wolf of want” is at the door of many people.

The Joseph House Crisis Center.

At the Joseph House Crisis Center, we issued 1,581 checks to help individuals and families pay for housing, utilities, health care, transportation, and other critical needs. Our Food Pantry gave out 12,514 bags of groceries; an average of 565 households, representing 1,275 people, received food each month. Our Soup Kitchen served 11,572 hot meals. Our Hospitality Room for homeless men and women responded 6,299 times to the needs of visitors. We provided showers, laundry, food, coats, blankets, and personal care products; on average we welcomed about 25 people per day, five days a week.

At Christmas, 793 children received a bag of gifts, which included a large toy, a smaller one, a book, a puzzle or activity book, assorted stocking stuffers, plus a hat, scarf, or mittens.

The Joseph House Workshop.

The Joseph House Workshop, next door to the Crisis Center, also had an eventful year. The Workshop is a long-term residential program for homeless men. It provides them with a supportive place to live where they engage in a process that (a) moves them from homelessness to stable living; (b) trains them to find and maintain employment; and (c) empowers them to reach their full potential.

There are currently four men in the program. One is getting ready to enter Phase 1 (classroom-based) and three are in Phase 2 (employment). All of the men came directly from drug and alcohol treatment centers or were referred to us from the Health Department.

In-house classes focus on relapse prevention as well as personal growth based on popular devotional books. To give the men a creative outlet we offer classes on various arts and crafts. Being well-rounded individuals is extremely important to living a healthy lifestyle. In addition to involvement in 12-Step activities, several of the men participate in Celebrate Recovery and weekly Sunday Services at SonRise Church. The residents are also active in community service on an “as needed” basis.

Of the men in the employment phase, one is working as a cook, another is a floor technician at the hospital with the third getting ready to work there, too. The Workshop helps the men every step of the way in finding a job and provides transportation to and from their job sites. A percentage of each resident’s paycheck goes into a savings account for when they leave the program—a great boost for the next stage of their lives.

Feed the body, feed the soul. Becoming confident in the kitchen is part of life at the Workshop.

Many of our graduates live in the area, supporting themselves and reconnecting with family members. Dramatic, life-changing transformations have occurred. A highlight of this past year was a visit from a graduate who is now in the armed forces. He wanted to spend time at the Workshop before his deployment to Hawaii. Meeting our graduates is the best way to inspire those in the program!

Numbers tell just part of the story. Behind every figure is the work of a volunteer and the generosity of a donor. We don’t have space to mention every individual, business, and organization that contributes, although we thank them personally. Also, “Your Father who sees in secret will repay you” (Matthew 6:4). All of this generosity helps people in a deep and meaningful way. We are overjoyed and sometimes overwhelmed by it. Thank you.

There is never time to rest in serving the poor. One year ends, another begins, and “The poor you will always have with you” (Matthew 26:11). Next month we will continue with stories about the people we help. With our gratitude and never-ending prayers,

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary


Stay in touch with the Joseph House

Founder: Sr. Mary Elizabeth Gintling
Year of Foundation: 1965
Mission Statement: To promote social justice and stable family life through direct assistance to the poor, whatever their needs may be.
Administrators: The Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary
Superior General: Sr. Marilyn Bouchard

Website: thejosephhouse.org
Email: LSJM[at]comcast[dot]net
Facebook: facebook.com/thejosephhousesalisbury
Instagram: instagram.com/thejosephhousesalisbury

Visit our website to donate online and subscribe to our Newsletter with your email to have it delivered electronically to your inbox.

The Joseph House is a non-profit and 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization. All gifts are tax-deductible.

At Joseph House, we help the poor with their immediate needs and also look for ways to address the underlying problems. I am open to everything, whatever it takes to help people, especially to help them know their own value.

Sr. Mary Elizabeth Gintling

Newsletter: September 2017

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

A prison can keep someone locked in, and also locked out.

In Upton Sinclair’s novel The Jungle, the protagonist, Jurgis Rudkus, finds himself homeless, destitute, and ravenously hungry. He staggers up and down the city streets looking for work, fighting hunger-induced fatigue. His struggle is to no avail: he is a prisoner, trapped in a type of reverse prison. As Sinclair explains,

“Everywhere he went, from one end of the vast city to the other, there were hundreds of others like him; everywhere was the sight of plenty — and the merciless hand of authority waving them away. There is one kind of prison where the man is behind bars, and everything that he desires is outside; and there is another kind where the things are behind the bars, and the man is outside.”

Excluded from society, not welcome anywhere, Rudkus is confined to the forgotten shadows. It’s easy for us to keep the poor and homeless locked in this sort of prison. We go about our lives, preoccupied with our own concerns, never seeing the poor because we avoid them. Mentally, if not physically, we shut them out from the world in which we choose to live.

Each of us has a key to this prison. The first door to unlock is the one leading to the heart. After that, we need to take a look at how we live. Ask God for help: He will open our eyes and opportunities to love the poor will present themselves. The doors we kept locked — out of fear? ignorance? prejudice? — will be in our power to open.

As a friend of the Joseph House, you already have an active concern for the well-being of people in need. With your support, we welcome the poor as our brothers and sisters and share with them the essential goods they are lacking. The Joseph House Crisis Center helps numerous families every week with food, rent, utility bills, and the like.

The Joseph House Workshop, which opened 12 years ago this month, provides personalized and in-depth assistance for up to eight homeless men at a time. The goal is to help these men learn the skills they need to find gainful employment and live independently. We’re not ones to toot our own horn, but the Workshop is doing a great job.

For homeless men, the Joseph House Workshop is an open door to a new life. It maintains a healthy, substance-free environment and is staffed 24 hours a day. Residents can live there for as long as two years (click here for more details about the program). Here is a report from the Workshop Director, Dr. Art Marsh, and the Resident Program Manager, Mr. Rudy Drummond:

We currently have all are beds filled or committed to be filled. We have seven residents housed at this point. One resident is in the most senior phase of the program, which requires considerable achievement. Four of our residents are about to begin Phase 2 (seeking employment). We currently have two residents about to enter Phase 1. We are awaiting another resident coming to us from Eastern Correctional Institution, who we anticipate will be joining us the end of this month.

One of our recent graduates, who enrolled in the Armed Services, will be returning to us for a brief visit before shipping out to his assigned station in South Korea. Several of our other successful graduates visit the Workshop periodically to confirm their on-going successes.

The Workshop is in need of volunteers to teach various aspects of Phase 1 life skill topics. The commitment would be for a one hour time period one to two days a week in the afternoon. It is our pleasure to note that all the successful residents, past and present, manifest a continued deep appreciation for all that the Workshop and the Little Sisters have given them.

God’s blessing has nurtured this ministry from the beginning. We’ve been told that the Workshop has quietly garnered an excellent reputation around town. This is due to the dedication and quality service supplied by the staff. You’re also key to the success: your generosity alone keeps the Workshop afloat. Thank you!

The Joseph House Workshop. Art is in front wearing a grey shirt, Rudy is in the back on the left.

Your generosity also makes the Crisis Center a refuge for people in need.

Tracey, 34, has three children and was working two jobs, but then she relapsed into alcoholism. She said stress was the reason she started drinking again. Tracey found a better reason for stopping — her family —  and has been sober for six months. She is trying to repair the damage that was done, and that includes getting the electricity turned back on in her home. The Joseph House paid $200 toward Tracey’s delinquent electric bill.

Howard, 59, is also trying to reclaim his life from alcoholism. He had his last drink a month ago while he was still homeless. Howard found a place to stay in a halfway house, but to continue living there he must pay rent. We agreed to send over $200. Howard opened up to one of our volunteers and talked about his childhood abuse and his current struggles with anxiety and depression.

Laura, 51, is a simple and humble woman. She lives alone and recently lost her job working in a restaurant kitchen. Her new job will be in a fast-food establishment. In the past month Laura earned $600. She paid some of her essential bills and was short on the $400 rent. We paid $200 to her landlord to stop the eviction.

When we die, we all hope St. Peter will open the Pearly Gates for us. How wonderful that will be, to be welcomed into God’s house, where there are many dwelling places and one prepared for each of us (John 14:2). Our exile will be at an end. In the meantime, let’s do what we can to help people who feel left out today.

As always, we hold you in our hearts each day in prayer. May you be blessed with happiness and peace.

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary

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