Newsletter: November 2019

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

A lovely custom with many people when they gather for Thanksgiving Dinner is to take turns saying what they’re thankful for. Expressing gratitude is good for the soul—and it’s what the holiday is all about.

In our humble cubicles at the Joseph House Crisis Center, sitting around tiny desks with cups of coffee, we hear words of gratitude all the time. They come from people who’ve had their prayers answered and feel (maybe for the first time in a long while) a sense of hope. Sometimes people will leave us notes. Their words are sincere and straight from the heart. We’d like to share a few of them with you:

“I was blessed the first time I set foot in Joseph House. Thank you for everything you’ve done for me.”

“Your staff was so courteous and friendly and so respectful. We are so grateful due to your loving help.”

“My husband underwent surgery and was in terrible pain and missed several days of work. Our gas bill for heating had gotten out of control and we needed help. We are so grateful that you did not turn us away.”

“Thank you for all of your help in trying to get me back on my feet. God’s angels have been working overtime to help me!”

“I think this is a very warm and comfortable atmosphere here. The people are generous and considerate. It’s just an outstanding facility.”

“I am thankful for this place where I can get a shower and a smile and most of all a sense of worth, because they do what they do out of love of God’s children.”

Your support means so much to so many people! People who receive help from the Joseph House are quick to tell us how grateful they are, and so we need to tell you because you make it all possible.

God has richly blessed our nation. We have an abundance of food and material goods. For many, life is a banquet. But not everyone shares in the feast…people who work hard for low wages; people who are beset with health problems; people advanced in years who need help with day-to-day living. Our greatness as a nation is most evident in how we care for those who are least in the eyes of the world. The best way to express gratitude for the blessings we enjoy is to share them with those in need. Won’t you please help us to do that?

Your generosity assists people like Jerome, age 53. He is disabled and lives on a monthly check of $640. His rent is $500. The electricity in Jerome’s apartment (part of a subdivided house) was going to be turned off because he was behind in paying the bill. The Joseph House sent in $175 to prevent that from happening.

Annabelle, 29, also needed help with her electric bill. She is a single mother of four children. Working at a fast-food restaurant, her day starts at 3:30am. She earns $800 per month. We were able to help with $180.

The things we take for granted are another person’s dream!

TURKEYS AND TOYS: To make the holiday season brighter for the less fortunate, we need donations of food and toys, which can be delivered to our convent at 411 North Poplar Hill Avenue in Salisbury.

Frozen turkeys and chickens for Thanksgiving are needed by November 24.

Christmas toys and gifts (new and unwrapped) for children up to the age of 14 are needed by December 15. We prefer gifts that do not require batteries. Also, we cannot accept toy guns.

Please contact us if you have any questions: Contact Form

ONLINE SHOPPING: If you shop on Amazon, please consider starting with our Amazon Smile link:

smile.amazon.com/ch/52-0846802

Amazon will then donate to the Joseph House a small percentage of your purchase total.

RETURN OF THE MAGI: This year the Magi Fund presents “A Magical Christmas,” a holiday concert to benefit the Joseph House and the Christian Shelter.

“A Magical Christmas” will feature the combined talents of renowned National Christian Choir pianist Michael Faircloth, Symphony 21’s composer and artistic director Daniel Bowen, and nationally recognized vocalist Diane King Susek. Michael, Daniel and Diane are teaming up to produce an exciting holiday celebration with a definite twist.

This will be a unique, professionally produced extravaganza of holiday music, sights and sounds that will thrill your heart, set the tone for your Christmas holiday AND raise those much needed funds for the Joseph House and the Christian Shelter!

One performance only: Sunday, December 8 at 2pm.
Location: James M. Bennett High School, 300 E. College Avenue in Salisbury.

Tickets are $20 in advance ($25 at the door), available at First Shore Federal Savings and Loan (all locations) and The Country House on Main Street in Salisbury.

There is also an order form on the website: magifund.com

COMMUNITY NEWS: On October 21, during a ceremony in our chapel in Princess Anne, Maryland, Sr. Nicole Soder received the habit and began her time as a novice. Sr. Virginia Peckham also renewed her temporary vows for the fifth time.

These are graced moments for everyone in our community, and we are so thankful for both Sisters for responding to God’s call. May God’s blessing be upon them!

Sr. Nicole receiving her habit after it was blessed by our chaplain, Fr. Dan McGlynn.
Sr. Virginia renewing her vows.

And we are very thankful for you, for being a friend of the Joseph House and the poor, and for all the ways you support us in our mission to help those in need. You are in our prayers every single day. A Happy and Blessed Thanksgiving to you and your loved ones!

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary


During this season of gratitude, we will joyfully lift up in prayer your special intentions. Please send them to us: Contact Form

Would you like to join us in our mission of helping the less fortunate? Find out how at this link: Donate


“As it does every year, it all began at Thanksgiving. The sheer weight of the advertising pages that arrived with the local newspapers was the first indication of how relentless corporate America is in colonizing our days. Thanksgiving, particularly, is a day that seems to be a threat to consumerism…”

It’s easy to get “consumed by consumerism.” This article is an important reminder about holiday shopping:

https://www.americamagazine.org/issue/555/ethics-notebook/consuming-christmas

Newsletter: November 2018

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

What if you woke up today with only what you thanked God for yesterday?

Reflecting on this can help us see all the things we take for granted: a place to live, a warm bed, food, clothing, our health, family and friends… the list goes on and on. It’s easy to forget that often we have more than enough, and that there’s a difference between our wants and our needs. If we are lacking anything it’s a sense of contentment.

Before eating Thanksgiving dinner, millions of people across the country will bow their heads and do what our national holiday is named for: give thanks. Oh how our lives become enriched when we make this an everyday activity! Taking a moment to be thankful at every meal is one of the best ways to cultivate an “attitude of gratitude.”

The Jewish table blessings have always appealed to us in a certain way. They invoke God as the Creator and Ruler of the Universe, reminding us that the entire universe is needed for us to have even a slice of bread. The rays of light streaming from the sun, plus the water, minerals and elements of the earth, all come together to make the simplest morsel. No matter who we are, our existence depends on so many things that are just given to us. How can we not be thankful?

A humbling aspect of our work at the Joseph House is meeting people who will gladly take what would otherwise be thrown away. But people deserve more than scraps. Through God’s grace we are united with you in being drawn to those in need. God has opened our ears to the cries of the poor, and if we each do our part then others will have, at the very least, their basic needs met. No one will have to shiver in the cold, face an empty refrigerator, or endure the perils of being homeless.

Celeste, 33, knows how hard it is not to have a home, and unfortunately so do her four children. They became homeless after Celeste lost her job. For eight long months they did not have a fixed address. A friend took them in, but when the landlord found out he ordered them to leave. Celeste now has a new job and works 30 hours per week. The possibility of additional hours is in the near future. To help Celeste and her family get settled off the streets, the Joseph House contributed $225 toward the security deposit for an apartment.

Duane, 26, was also homeless. He was renting a room in a house that burned to the ground. He lost everything, and two weeks later he was laid off from his job because of a seasonal slowdown (he works in a shipyard). We paid $150 for another rental so Duane can get back on his feet.

Bryan is only 25, but his heart has already given out and he needed a transplant. He is a veteran and he thinks his service in Iraq has something to do with it. After being on disability Bryan recently returned to work. He is married and has three children. Bryan doesn’t earn much at his job, and paying the bills is a struggle. We paid $200 toward a delinquent electric bill so the power would not be cut off in his home.

Pat, 53, is disabled after multiple surgeries on his neck, shoulders, and back. He receives a monthly check for $576. His wife of 30 years has been treated for breast and colon cancer. The cancer has spread, but she still works full-time—she has no choice—and brings home about $1000 per month. Pat needed help paying an overdue electric bill. We contributed $200.

About a year ago, Jerome, 62, began a downward spiral because of breathing and lung problems. He was hospitalized several times and could no longer work. At first, his landlord overlooked the unpaid rent, but when the amount reached $5,000 he sent Jerome packing. With the last of his money Jerome moved into a motel room. He came to our Crisis Center when he had nothing left. We sent $300 to the motel to give Jerome the time he needs until he receives his first Social Security check. A destitute person in such poor health must not be homeless.

Your donations are a lifesaver!

Thank you for all the ways you show your support for us and the poor. We wish you a Happy Thanksgiving with abundant blessings throughout the year. You are always in our prayers.

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary


HOLIDAY HELP NEEDED

We need donations of food and toys, which can be delivered to our convent at 411 North Poplar Hill Avenue in Salisbury.

Please help us to make the holidays brighter for hundreds of families.

Frozen turkeys and chickens for Thanksgiving are needed by November 18. Christmas toys and gifts (new and unwrapped) for children up to the age of 14 are needed by December 16. We prefer gifts that do not require batteries. Also, we cannot accept toy guns. Please call us at 410-742-9590 or send a message if you have any questions.

Newsletter: November 2017

Dear Friends of Joseph House:

A few years ago, Fr. Paul Mast, a Catholic priest of the Diocese of Wilmington, spent a six-month sabbatical immersed in the lives of people living on the streets. The experience spoke to his heart, and he wrote about what he learned in a book called Street Sabbatical. In one story, he describes how helping the homeless involved a creative approach with their all-too-familiar cardboard signs:

I played the Public Relations Guru by challenging the imagination of two homeless men to change the message on their cardboard signs. Most of the signs I see have words that sound like “standard issue.” The message is so common and expected that the ones who carry them become invisible. The people walking the streets who live in houses aren’t inspired to engage those homeless because the signs have become familiar and in our culture, familiarity breeds contempt.

When I suggested that their signs tell a story they laughed saying their piece of cardboard wasn’t big enough to tell a story. I told them that it wasn’t the amount of words that told a story but the choice of words. Supposedly, Ernest Hemingway was asked to write a “full” story in just six words. Legend has it he wrote: “For sale: Baby shoes, never worn!” What a story hidden in those words.

Those two homeless men stopped laughing when they heard that and after they got quiet we began to rewrite their signs. Here is what our imaginations created:

I’ve forgotten what a kind word sounds like. Please speak one!
I’m good at Please. Help me say Thank you more!
I’ve lost my dignity. Help me find it in your smile!
I’ve forgotten how to smile. Can I use your face as a mirror?
I hunger for a kind word as much as a cup of coffee.
Being homeless happened. Help me dream a way out of it.
Homeless, but also hungry for hope.
What I really need is a Good Samaritan!

Take a moment to reflect on these messages. Imagine people holding them. They can help us to see the homeless with new eyes. They can reactivate our feelings of compassion that have become worn out — a little humanizing goes a long way.

Fr. Paul Mast.

As Fr. Mast writes, these messages help us to “see a person with a story and not just someone stuck with the label ‘homeless.'”

Yes, every person has a story. By reading this Newsletter, you’ve gotten to know the stories of people who live in poverty. They are not anonymous faces — they are people who endure hunger, homelessness, and the other miseries of being poor. They are people who don’t have the luxury of ignoring these realities.

Your support of the Joseph House breaks the isolation that makes the poor feel their circumstances are hopeless. Thank you for being there for us — and for the people we lovingly serve.

We’d like to bring attention to one couple’s story. Eddie and Camille were homeless when they first came to the Joseph House. Eddie had back problems from an accident at work, and Camille was suffering from severe food poisoning. We immediately took her to the hospital where she stayed for four days. Upon her release, she joined Eddie in a motel room that we provided temporarily.

We then found a place for Eddie and Camille in a transitional shelter to give them time to get back on their feet. That was three months ago. Eddie now has a job at a restaurant and confided to us that he is no longer taking pain pills (he was afraid he was getting addicted). Tina is working part-time at a bank. They are saving money and getting ready to move out of the shelter. Both Eddie and Camille look to the future with optimism, something that once seemed impossible.

There is one thing they really need: reliable transportation. Eddie walks an hour to work each day, and although Camille can catch the bus, that may change when they move. Maybe someone would like to donate a used car? We are making this request and leaving it in God’s care.

Your generosity does so much for people in need. Stefan, for example, is 29 years old and autistic. His mother, who lives with and cares for him, said Stefan was born this way. She also told us his teeth never developed properly. They lack enamel and are rotting. We could see that Stefan’s teeth were in bad shape. His mother was worried about the pain and the spread of infection through his body. We called a dentist and paid $200 so Stefan could have emergency dental work.

Ginger, 36, is deaf and the mother of three. She recently moved her family because their previous residence was uninhabitable. Their new place is better, and Ginger was working as a dish washer to support her children. Then she lost her job, couldn’t pay the rent, and received an eviction notice. We sent the landlord $180 to give Ginger time to find a new job and not become homeless with her family.

The Joseph House assists working families every week and it’s all thanks to you.

Can we ask for even more? We try to make the holiday season a little brighter for the poor, and we need your help!

We need donations of food and toys, which can be delivered to our convent at 411 North Poplar Hill Avenue in Salisbury.

Frozen turkeys and chickens for Thanksgiving are needed by November 20.

Christmas toys and gifts (new and unwrapped) for children up to the age of 14 are needed by December 17. We prefer gifts that do not require batteries. Also, we cannot accept toy guns. Please contact us if you have any questions (410-742-9590 or LSJM@comcast.net).

There have been several tragic events lately, both at the hands of nature and of man. So many people have suffered grievous losses. The heartache touches us deeply and makes us grateful for all the things we take for granted. Perhaps this year as we celebrate Thanksgiving we can show our gratitude by reaching out a little more to those in need.

May this Day of Thanks be a blessing to you and the ones you hold dear!

Your Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary

 

A Thanksgiving Prayer

O God, our God, we come before you in thanksgiving.

We come before you in the richness of autumn, pondering the shapes and colors of all your gifts, marveling at the landscape of our lives.

We come before you, filled with the power of your love, recognizing your presence, in the fruits of our labors and the bonds of our relationships.

We gather our sunshine and our shadow, our joy and our pain, our success and our failure, our love and our loneliness and, binding all together, we give them back to you.

We come before you like trusting children with outstretched arms, embracing all that fills the fields of our lives, lifting up every precious gift for your holy blessing.

Receive what we are, and make our lives whole.

Bless our world, and bring all your children peace.

And finally, gather all that you have created into the eternal celebration of your love.

Amen.

Author unknown